Clay Masters joined the Iowa Public Radio newsroom as a correspondent in 2012.  He covers the statehouse when the legislature is in session, and reports on a variety of topics the rest of the year. Clay is an award-winning multi-media journalist whose radio stories have been heard on various NPR and American Public Media programs. His television documentaries have aired on PBS stations across the country. He’s also a regular contributor to NPR’s arts desk, covering indie music news.

Clay is a Nebraska native and worked for Nebraska Public Radio and Television (NET) before coming to IPR. He was one of the founding reporters of Harvest Public Media, the CPB-funded Local Journalism project covering agriculture in the Midwest.

Little Havana
5:00 pm
Tue January 8, 2013

In ‘Etudes,’ The Whole House Dances

ETUDES: Performance space is everywhere at Little Havana's Red Velvet Theater.

For artburstmiami.com

When you walk into artist Pablo Cano’s Red Velvet Theater in Little Havana, you are greeted by the most elegant of ladies — Marie Antoinette herself. The larger-than-life marionette welcomes you with her tightly corseted waist, lifted bosom and fine European lips.

Read more
Environment
2:00 pm
Tue January 8, 2013

Why Wading Birds Are Getting A Little Less Busy In The Everglades

Nesting numbers of wading birds are considered an important measure of the health of the overall system.
Credit Vlabed/Flickr

Breeding numbers were down for some bird species for the third straight year in a row in the Everglades.

Nesting numbers for wading birds fell by 38 percent compared to the past decade. That's according to an annual survey compiled by the South Florida Water Management District.

Read more
Topical Currents
1:00 pm
Tue January 8, 2013

HAITI: The Aftershocks of History

Historian/author Laurent Dubois
http://duboisl2.wordpress.com/

01/08/13 - Tuesday's Topical Currents is with historian Laurent Dubois, author of HAITI:  The Aftershocks of History.  Even before the 2010 earthquake destroyed much of the country, Haiti was known for its poverty and corruption.  Dubois says Haiti can only be understood by its complex past and inception as the only successful slave revolt in world history.  Can a new Haiti emerge from its legacy?

Video:  Laurent Dubois talks about What We Must Know in Order to Help Haiti:

Read more
Dental Health
11:52 am
Tue January 8, 2013

Amazing Sealants Defeat Childhood Tooth Decay But Does Florida Care? Study Says 'No'

CHEAP AND PAINLESS: Dental sealants can reduce decay by 60 percent. A critical study says Florida needs more school-based sealant programs.
Credit Oral Health Florida

Florida is missing a cheap and easy bet for improving the dental health of its children, according to a new survey.

The Pew Children's Dental Campaign gives the state a "D," mostly because it does little to make sure kids have access to decay-fighting tooth sealant programs in public schools.

Read more
Florida Lottery
11:00 am
Tue January 8, 2013

A New Look For The Florida Lottery

This new logo was unveiled to celebrate the Florida Lottery's 25th anniversary.
Credit flalottery.com

The Florida Lottery is getting an image makeover to coincide with its 25th anniversary.

An audience of Bright Futures scholarship winners applauded as the new logo was unveiled at Lottery headquarters in Tallahassee.

Lottery leaders showcased the new logo, which prominently features a pink flamingo.

Florida Lottery Secretary Cynthia O’Connell says the redesigned brand should help lure new players.

Read more
StateImpact Florida
9:30 am
Tue January 8, 2013

How Florida Earned Second-Highest Grade On A National Education Policy Report Card

PARTNERS: StudentsFirst founder Michelle Rhee has advised Florida Gov. Rick Scott. Her group is recommending changes to Florida education policies
Credit Huffington Post

California-based StudentsFirst has released a report card grading states on their education policy.

Florida earned the second-highest grade in the country, a B-, behind only Louisiana. No state earned an A.

Read more
Energy
9:00 am
Tue January 8, 2013

Progress Energy's $100-Million Dilemma: Retire Or Repair Crystal River Nuclear Plant

PROBLEM PLANT: The Crystal River nuclear plant in Citrus County has been idle since an accident in 2009. Progress Energy may owe customers $100 million if it doesn't come back on line.
Credit Flaglerlive.com

Still undecided about whether to repair or permanently shut down an idled nuclear-power plant, Progress Energy Florida faces the likelihood of eventually refunding up to $100 million to customers.

The refunds stem from a wide-ranging settlement agreement that Progress reached in early 2012 with representatives of consumers and business groups. Under that settlement, the utility would not have been subject to refunding money if it started repairs on the Crystal River nuclear plant by Dec. 31.

Read more
Working
8:30 am
Tue January 8, 2013

Bill Aims To Bar Local Government From Ordering Employers To Offer Sick Leave

WORKING SICK: Tallahassee lawmakers this spring will decide whether to prohibit cities and counties from ordering employers to pay for sick days off.

Advocates for working folk haven’t had a lot of luck establishing a right to paid sick leave in Florida.

Miami-Dade County Commissioner Barbara Jordan's proposal was defeated last year and, in Orlando, Orange County commissioners found a way to avoid a sick time referendum, even though 50,000 residents had won a ballot spot, fair and square, with their signatures on a petition.

Read more
Florida Legislature
8:00 am
Tue January 8, 2013

Florida's Growing Stack Of Early Voting Bills

THE WAIT: Bills to re-expand early voting to eliminate lines like this one in Doral are accumulating in Tallahassee.
Credit Miami Herald

Republican  State Sen. Miguel Diaz de la Portilla of Miami was an early and enthusiastic supporter of cutting back Florida's early voting period from 14 to 8 days in 2011. He called it a "voter friendly" bill that would save money.

"Generally, early voting in Miami-Dade County has not been very efficient, " Diaz de la Portilla said at the time. "What you see more often than not is that there is a trickle of two or three people a day at a very high cost to keep those public libraries and polls open. ... We felt it was an efficiency measure."

Read more

Pages