Peter Haden / WLRN

Gov. Rick Scott says he expects major school safety reform to pass by next Friday — the last day of the legislative session.

Scott pushed his $500 million plan at the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office Thursday.

Gov. Scott’s plan would include more law enforcement officers at schools, target hardening (making school buildings harder to attack or breach), more funding for mental health programs and keeping guns away from people who may be a threat to themselves or others.

“We have the money,” Scott said. “We have to spend the money.”

Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills
Charles Trainor Jr. Miami Herald / WLRN

Hurricane Irma may have slammed across South Florida almost six months ago, but some are still feeling the effects of the storm.  


Associated Press

Venezuela's presidential election has been moved back a month. The government had originally scheduled it for April; but on Thursday the National Electoral Council announced it's holding off until May 20.

Even that puts the election more than six months ahead of when government opponents say it was legally supposed to be held. That's a big reason almost all of Venezuela's opposition is boycotting the vote. They say it's being rigged by President Nicolas Maduro and his authoritarian socialist regime to make sure he wins another six-year term.

Associated Press

President Trump hosted lawmakers from both parties to discuss gun policy and school safety on Wednesday.

During the freewheeling meeting, Trump appeared to support a number of conflicting measures and showed naivete about the legislative process.

NPR journalists have annotated a transcript of the exchange, adding context and analysis. You can read it below: 

Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

Students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School returned Thursday for their second day of classes since the shooting on Feb. 14 that killed 17.

This time around they were not greeted with the same fanfare as Wednesday, when crowds of supporters, police officers and even therapy dogs lined the perimeter of the school to welcome them back for the first time in two weeks.

Instead, students entered the building chatting with friends or listening to music on their earbuds -- things one might see on any ordinary school day, though things in Parkland are still far from ordinary.

Terence Shepherd / WLRN News

A controversial proposal that would allow armed teachers in schools has led to bipartisan bickering and prompted accusations that people in both parties are making political pawns of victims of this month’s catastrophic shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that left 14 students and three faculty members dead.

Tim Padgett /

Venezuela’s humanitarian crisis is now a crisis in next-door Colombia. Thousands of Venezuelans are fleeing their country’s economic collapse each day, and pressure is mounting to help them. The diaspora here in South Florida is making an especially strong call.

Former Venezuelan Senator and opposition leader Pablo Medina just arrived in Miami after touring the Venezuelan-Colombian border. Some 600,000 Venezuelans now reside in Colombia, and thousands more keep coming by the day.



I’ve covered a lot of racist political ads.

In 1983, I watched bigoted white Democratic leaders in Chicago urge voters to reject black mayoral candidate Harold Washington “before it’s too late.” It didn’t work; he became the Second City’s first black mayor. In 1988 I was gobsmacked by Republican presidential candidate George H.W. Bush’s race-baiting Willie Horton spots. They did work; he became the U.S.’s 41st President.


A clear majority of Florida voters support a nationwide ban on assault weapons and oppose arming teachers or school officials, according to a poll released Wednesday.

A Quinnipiac University poll released Wednesday found that 62 percent of voters favor a ban on assault weapons, and about two-thirds support “stricter gun laws,” like universal background checks or a ban on the sale of high-capacity ammunition magazines, while 56 percent oppose arming faculty members.


Wikimedia Commons

Addiction specialists and law enforcement officials are pleading with Florida House members to keep funding for an injectable opioid-addiction treatment.


The House’s proposed budget zeroes out funding for Vivitrol, a drug that blocks opioid receptors in the brain for 30 days.


broward county sheriff's deputy
Leslie Ovalle / WLRN

Therapy horses and puppies, as well as law enforcement officers and members of the community, gathered around Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Wednesday morning to welcome students on their first day back since the shooting that killed 17 students and faculty two weeks earlier.

“Welcome back. How are you feeling?” Deputy Bernard Hilson asked, as he hugged students before they crossed the street to enter the school.

Students responded that they felt better and thanked him for being there.


The Florida House is expected Thursday to approve a measure that would allow law-enforcement officers to pull over people for texting while driving, but the brakes have been applied in the Senate.

Senate sponsor Keith Perry, R-Gainesville, said Wednesday he continues to push for the measure (SB 90), though Appropriations Chairman Rob Bradley has indicated the proposal likely won’t appear in the Appropriations Committee before the legislative session ends next week.

“All I can do is push as hard as I can on getting stuff done,” Perry said.

Kate Stein / WLRN

Palm Beach County's prized natural areas -- protected areas of dunes, wetlands, scrub and flatwood forests -- could lose money for maintenance in the next few years because of changes to funding sources.

Matias Ocner / WLRN News

A heavy police presence and a steady stream of well-wishers — some with two legs and some with four — were on hand Wednesday morning as students returned to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High for the first day of classes since the school shooting two weeks ago that killed 17 people and injured 15 others.