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Courtesy photo Little Free Libraries

Next time you see a newspaper box in Palm Beach County, look closer. It may be a “Little Free Library.”

Palm Beach County is adding some “fun-sized” libraries, as part of a worldwide initiative to encourage more kids to pick up a book and read.

 These colorful boxes are designed to encourage children between 4 to 16 years of age. The books were provided by Children's Services Council of Palm Beach County. 


Walter Michot / Miami Herald

The newest data from the U.S. Census shows Florida's population grew by almost a million and a half between 2010 and 2015. And, more than half of those new residents are Hispanic.

Courtsey Pro Footvolley Tour

This story first aired on December 14, 2015.   

These days, if you’re sitting on a South Florida beach and someone shouts, “Shark attack!” it’s probably got nothing to do with “Jaws.” Instead, it’s all about feet.

Namely, a sport called footvolley.

Fourth of July In Miami Gardens ... Nigerian Style

Jul 5, 2016
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

At the Betty T. Ferguson Recreation Center in the heart of Miami Gardens, a couple hundred people came out to play, compete in flag football and basketball, step, and watch the Fourth of July activities ... all with a Nigerian Twist.

 

 

The City of Miami-Gardens partnered with the Edo association of Florida for an all day event.

Public domain

Nonprofit transportation research group TRIP released a study last week that names Florida’s interstate highways the 9th most congested in the country.

 

The study shows that travel is increasing too fast for states to keep up, but Greg Stuart, executive director of the Metropolitan Planning Organization in Broward County, says the study bodes well for Florida’s future.

 

Note: This story first ran last summer. The group Mangoes to Share is back at it this summer, and they say they've been scheduling "non-stop" pickups.  Organizer Anna Milaeva tells us the owner of one vacant lot has given them carte blanche to pick mangoes from 30 trees on the property. They've been picking other fruit too, like star fruit, lychees and avocados.

Courtesy

Thousands of swimmers are celebrating the 4th of July weekend by jumping in the water in Miami Beach. But if you want to know how clean the water has been, the answer could cost you nearly $73 thousand.

That’s what Miami Beach officials wanted to charge Jenny Staletovich, who covers environmental issues for the Miami Herald.

Earlier this month, she reported on a study that found high levels of human waste and bacteria related to storm water pumps.

Orlando Sentinel

It’s been an article of undisputed faith among Florida cops, prosecutors and journalists for decades that phone calls to 911 are public records. So media lawyers were flabbergasted last month when Orlando police refused to turn over recordings of the 911 calls made during the murderous shootout inside the Pulse nightclub that left 49 people dead. 

At the same time, they weren’t surprised at all.

Protestors gathered Friday in Stuart near the private land visited by Senator Marco Rubio during his tour viewing areas hit by the algae.
Jill Roberts

This week on The Florida Roundup...

New details are emerging about the horror inside the Pulse nightclub massacre in Orlando. Transcripts of police communications also raise questions about the  law enforcement response. Why is it important to understand the police decisions involved, and what do these records indicate?

Listen here: 

Caitie Switalski / WLRN

Miami-Dade County has a new partnership in the fight against traffic woes.

The smartphone navigation app Waze has just added the county to its growing list of governments that are connected to its traffic data system. When users report traffic accidents, Miami-Dade will now know about it.

“My goal is that on any day, whether it’s a weekday or a weekend, people get in the habit of using the app to plan their trip, 'cause that just helps everybody,” said Alice Bravo, the director of transportation and public works for the county.

Epidemiology Congress of the Americas

Climate change isn’t just an environmental problem. If you ask Michael McGeehin, climate change is a health crisis.

McGeehin is an epidemiologist who spent more than 30 years at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He developed the CDC’s Climate Change Program.

McGeehin was recently in Miami for an international epidemiology conference. And he spoke with Health News Florida about how public health is threatened by changing rain patterns, sea level rise and heat waves:

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

  The old Seven Mile Bridge hasn't carried car traffic since 1982.

But the span from Knight's Key to Pigeon Key has become a kind of linear park for the Middle Keys, offering spectacular sunset views.

  "We're fortunate to be able to have the bridge that we can walk out on," said Leslie Christensen of Marathon. "It think it attracts a lot of tourists and a lot of people like to come and take pictures. It's a real iconic part of Marathon."

Michal Kranz

  Community members gathered at West Palm Beach City Hall on Thursday for a sit-in in support of two gun control bills in the House of Representatives. Congresswoman Lois Frankel organized the event after participating in a sit-in last week on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. 

The two bills Frankel is fighting for are what she calls “common sense” measures to reduce gun violence. One of the bills would bar terror suspects from obtaining firearms, and the other would close loopholes that allow people to buy guns online and at gun shows without background checks. 

Keith Allison via Flikr / WLRN

The NBA’s free agency period starts Friday and the fate of the face of The Miami Heat, star player Dwyane Wade, hangs in the balance.

 

 

The Miami Heat’s President Pat Riley has his eyes on one player in particular during this year’s free agency period, that’s what Miami Herald sports columnist Greg Cote believes.

 

“The elite player that Pat Riley refers to as a whale. They’re whale hunting, The Heat. So, if they can get Kevin Durant, that takes priority over everything,” Cote said.

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