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Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

  You know you’re in Miami when the call to prayer is delivered in a Guayabera. After the muezzin sang, Imam Nasir Ahmad approached the lectern at Masjid Al-Ansar on Northwest 54th Street to greet a hall full of Christians and Jews who responded to a call by MCCJ, the Miami Coalition of Christians and Jews, to join Friday prayers at a local mosque. “You outnumber my own congregation,” he said with a chuckle.

 

A Miami appeals court is siding with Governor Rick Scott and San Francisco-based technology giant Uber in a dispute over the status of part-time drivers. 

The Third District Court of Appeals in Miami has decided Uber drivers are independent contractors and not employees and therefore not eligible for unemployment benefits.

The ruling cites a standard Uber contract requiring drivers to acknowledge that they are independent contractors. The driver argued Uber controls almost every aspect of his performance and had the right to fire him.

Do you know where your congressional delegates stand on president Donald Trump's immigration order? 

NPR and dozens of member stations like WLRN wanted to help the public understand where its lawmakers stand on the issue. Collectively, we searched for public statements on Twitter and Facebook, on lawmakers' websites and in interviews with us in public media or other news organizations. We did this for each of the 536 members of Congress — 100 senators, 435 voting members of the House, and the District of Columbia's nonvoting House delegate.

Peter Andrew Bosch / Miami Herald

Trayvon Martin's parents, Sybrina Fulton and Tracy Martin, emerged as activists after their son’s death--saying that justice was not served.

USGS, via Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Sugar Corporation could be required to sell land for a water storage plan proposed by Florida Senate President Joe Negron.

 

Senate Bill 10, filed last week, contains Negron's proposal to build one or more water storage reservoirs on 60,000 acres south of Lake Okeechobee. The reservoirs would help mitigate blue-green algae growth along Florida's coasts. Under the bill, the South Florida Water Management District would have until the end of 2017 to find a willing seller of 60,000 acres of land.

 

Courtesy National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation added Miami’s Little Havana Neighborhood to its list of “National Treasures,"  which contains more than 75 buildings, neighborhoods and natural landscapes threatened by development or neglect.

The only other treasure from Florida is another Miami landmark, the Miami Marine Stadium.

Emilly Michot / Miami Herald

Protests continued on Tuesday against Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez’s decision to bow to President Trump’s demands on immigration detentions.

Madeline Fox / WLRN News

Protesters in Miami-Dade took to the streets for the second time in less than a week to protest the county's Mayor's recent decision to effectively abandon the county’s stance as a “sanctuary” for undocumented immigrants. 

Carlos Gimenez's order, issued last Thursday in response to President Donald Trump’s executive order aimed at denying federal funds to “sanctuary cities,” asked county jails to comply with federal immigration requests.

Julio Ochoa / WUSF

Two of the 27 plaintiffs in a lawsuit against President Trump's executive order temporarily banning some immigrants from coming to the United States are from Florida.

One is an unnamed Syrian man from Broward County and the other is Hassan Shibly, the director of Florida's chapter of the Council on American Islamic Relations in Tampa.

Facebook

A federal jury deliberated for just over an hour Tuesday before convicting a 25-year-old Key West man on two terror-related charges.

Harlem Suarez, 25, was found guilty of attempting to use a weapon of mass destruction and attempting to provide material support to a foreign terrorist organization.

The case started in April 2015 when the FBI received a report about a Facebook user who was attempting to recruit people to join ISIS, the terrorist group. That Facebook user was Suarez, then 23 and living with his parents in their apartment on Stock Island.

CHELSEA BECK / NPR

President Trump has issued an executive order temporarily banning travel from seven Muslim-majority countries. The move, which has raised a series of legal questions, sparked protests around the country as people who had previously been approved to come to the United States were being detained at airports. Here is the order in full, annotated by NPR journalists.

Tom Hudson

With record tourism comes big business, but you won’t find a front desk at one of the largest lodging groups in the state - Airbnb.

The home-sharing network has almost 33,000 hosts in Florida, generating millions of dollars for it and the hosts, basically property owners who rent a room, home or a condo for a few days to a visitor. The company calls it a short-term rental and insists it is not in competition with the hotel business.

The traditional hotel business is growing in South Florida. Here's what 2016 looked like for hotels in Miami-Dade and Broward counties:

Peter Haden / WLRN

A new exhibition at the Boca Raton Museum of Art wants us to rethink the way we look at something all around us: glass.

“These are not decorations,” said Kathleen Goncherov, curator of contemporary art. “A lot of this work is very political. These pieces tell stories.”

She points to an elaborate, floor-ceiling chandelier by Chinese artist Song Dong.

“This is a take on a traditional Venetian chandelier, except it has surveillance cameras on it,” said Goncherov. “It’s called “Glass Big Brother.”

Amanda Rabines / WLRN News

Americans gathered at a number of U.S. airports over the weekend – including Miami International Airport, Fort Lauderdale International Airport and Palm Beach International Airport – to protest President Donald J. Trump’s order to keep many foreigners out of the country.

Amanda Rabines / WLRN

Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez's latest actions on immigration lured protesters to his office on Friday. 

Nearly 100 people showed up to protest the mayor’s decision to comply with President Donald Trump’s executive order on immigration enforcement that threatened to cut federal funds from "sanctuary cities."  The action essentially negates the county's previous stance of not agreeing to hold illegal immigrants in county jails under federal mandate.

 

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