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A Florida State University study links declining bumble bee populations with climate change.

The researchers examined three bumble bee species in the Colorado Rocky Mountains and found warmer temperatures are affecting flowers, the animals’ food source.

Lead investigator Jane Ogilvie considers the findings a warning for other places like Florida, where she says the issue is not as well-studied.

“There could be subtle changes in how flowers are distributed in a place like Florida that could have these knock-on effects on pollinators.”

Senate Pushes To Expand Bright Futures Scholarship

Oct 10, 2017
Miami Herald

An additional 44,000 Bright Futures students would have their scholarships expanded under a bill approved Monday by the Senate Education Committee.

The legislation (SB 4), sponsored by Sen. Bill Galvano, R-Bradenton, would increase scholarship coverage for “medallion scholars” in state universities from the current $77 per credit hour to $159, or roughly 75 percent of the cost of tuition and fees.

Courtesy of Florida Senate

Two weeks after pulling off a major victory in a special election, Annette Taddeo was sworn in Tuesday as the first Hispanic Democratic woman to serve in the Florida Senate.

Florida Supreme Court Justice Peggy Quince administered the oath of office to Taddeo, who was joined by her 11-year-old daughter, Sofia, husband, Eric Goldstein, and mother, Elizabeth Taddeo. Annette Taddeo defeated former Republican House member Jose Felix Diaz during a Sept. 26 special election in Miami-Dade County's Senate District 40.

Miami Herald

Emory Jones just needs to look at his left arm for a reminder of what happened at Avon Park Youth Academy. There is a faint scar in the shape of a snake above his elbow from when an officer beat him.

Peter Haden / WLRN

The water level in Lake Okeechobee has reached a level not seen in more than a decade — 17.16 feet — prompting concerns about the integrity of the Herbert Hoover Dike.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott accompanied U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Colonel Jason Kirk on a levee inspection around the lake in Clewiston on Monday.

The  Corps of Engineers will be conducting daily inspections of the southern half of the Herbert Hoover dike as long as the water level remains above 17 feet.

The Corps predicts the dike will remain sound, according to Kirk.  

WALTER MICHOT / Miami Herald

Florida Power & Light spent $3 billion over the past decade to strengthen its lines and power grid. But after Hurricane Irma left millions of FPL customers without power for a week or more, critics are asking what the money accomplished. 

The utility company says that the money was well spent and that the recovery after Irma went far better than the efforts after Hurricane Wilma. We'll hear from the utility on their performance, as well as the Florida Office of Public Counsel, the office created to represent utility consumers.

Courtsey Carla Leon

Before Hurricane Irma ravaged Cuba’s north coast last month, Carla León’s private business – renting her family’s three-bedroom house in Havana through Airbnb – had already begun losing customers thanks to another force of nature: Donald Trump.

Tom Hudson

Hurricane Irma dealt a blow to the agriculture industry in South Florida. Local damage estimates are still being calculated, but initial figures put it at around $250 million in Miami-Dade County alone. It’s too early to tell what the price of the storm will be for Palm Beach County farmers. The sugarcane harvest begins this month and crop loss will become more apparent.

Carl Juste / Miami Herald

Florida Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson has co-signed a letter asking the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to send more support to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands in the wake of Hurricanes Irma and Maria.

Health-care funding was already tight before the storms, particularly in financially unstable Puerto Rico, where nearly half the population is covered by Medicaid.

WP PAARZ / FLICKR

A backlog of immigration hearings nationwide continues to grow because judges are being reassigned as the Trump administration focuses on asylum hearings in border towns, according to a recent investigation by  Telemundo 51 and NBC 6 South Florida. 

Myriam Masihy, consumer investigative reporter for Telemundo 51 and NBC 6 South Florida, investigated the backlog and joined WLRN’s Tom Hudson Friday to talk about the report on The Florida Roundup. 

Miami Herald

For the last two years, the Miami Herald has been looking into systemic abuse within the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice (DJJ), the division designed to rehabilitate minors who get into trouble with the law.

The Debut Of The Florida Round Up: Statewide Edition

Oct 6, 2017
Melissa Ross and Tom Hudson
WJCT and WLRN

 

Friday on WLRN (co-produced with WJCT) "The Florida Roundup: Statewide Edition" premiered. 

Each week WLRN's Tom Hudson and WJCT's Melissa Ross, along with a panel of journalists from around the state, discuss the week in Florida news.

Here's what the The Florida Roundup: Statewide Edition will cover. 

 

Tune in every Friday at 1 p.m. on 91.3FM

 

Video Screenshot

Earlier this year, two of Trinidad and Tobago's  soca superstars teamed up for the Carnival single “Buss Head,” and now they’re teaming up again in Miami —this time for a philanthropic cause.

Caitie Switalski

If Mike Lambrix’s case played out today exactly the way it did when he was convicted in 1984, he would not have been sent to Death Row and executed, as he was Thursday night.

For more than a year and a half I exchanged letters with Lambrix, who preferred to go by Mike. I met him and his family to report the radio documentary: “Cell 1: Florida’s Death Penalty in Limbo.” The death penalty in Florida is no longer in limbo, and Lambrix was the second inmate to be put to death since executions resumed at the end of August.

Peter Haden / WLRN

Hundreds of anxious South Floridians swarmed the Port Everglades cruise terminal Tuesday morning to welcome a cruise ship transformed into a relief vessel: Royal Caribbean’s Adventure of the Seas.

Its storm-weary cargo:  nearly 4,000 evacuees from Puerto Rico and the U-S Virgin Islands fleeing the ravages of Hurricanes Maria and Irma.

The ship represented a new start for some, reunification for others after the one-two punch of hurricanes smashed the Caribbean with devastating force last month, leaving millions without power, homes or jobs.

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