News

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

South Miami Mayor Philip Stoddard may be one of the most liberal mayors in Florida, so he would be a natural candidate to push through a package of local gun-control rules in the wake of the Parkland massacre 50 miles away. But that would be against the law.

Florida bans cities and counties from imposing their own gun-control rules. Seven years ago, the Republican-controlled Legislature even created a $5,000 fine it can impose on mayors like Stoddard if they ever try to enforce stricter regulations on firearms.

Odalis Garcia / WLRN

Monday night's rain was not an obstacle for more than a hundred people who showed up at  Betti Stradling Park in Coral Springs, just five minutes from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, to participate in one of the several candlelight vigils organized by the Florida Parent Teacher Association (PTA) around the state to honor the victims of the Parkland shooting. 

Fernando Llano / AP

Every day thousands of Venezuelans are fleeing their country to escape the worst economic collapse in the world today. Many have come to South Florida. Venezuela’s GDP is sinking so deep, and its hyperinflation is rising so fast, it’s hard to keep track of exchange rates, food prices, minimum wages, foreign reserves and other critical economic indicators. And the authoritarian socialist regime is trying to keep a lot of that embarrassing data hidden.

Susan Stocker / Sun Sentinel via Miami Herald

After last week’s school shooting in Parkland that killed 17 people, a lot of focus has fallen on the home where the confessed shooter was living. WLRN spoke with the father of that family about the young man’s mental health issues – and about issues of gun ownership.

As the victims of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting are being remembered across South Florida this week, hundreds from the Parkland community came to remember 14-year-old Jaime Guttenberg on Sunday, as well as 15 year-old Luke Hoyer and 14-year old Alaina Petty on Monday morning. 

 

Sun Sentinel

Shackled and wearing a red jump suit, school shooter Nikolas Cruz made his first live appearance in a Broward County circuit court five days after he walked into Marjory Stoneman Douglas High and fatally shot 17 people in the worst school shooting in Florida history.

Cruz, a slightly built teen, did not say anything and never looked up at the crowd from his seat at the defense table. It was a tense atmosphere — Cruz was surrounded by Broward Sheriff’s deputies as media members and other lawyers watched from the gallery.

C.M. Guerrero / El Nuevo Herald

The conservative Republican leader of the state House of Representatives wants a bill to become law so badly, he tied it to billions of dollars in public school funding. The Democrats in his chamber call the legislation an unprecedented attack on public education.

Teresa Frontado

The grief and mourning continue for the 17 dead students and staff killed in last week’s mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland. But something else is happening among the anguish of the interrupted lives of the victims and survivors. Out of the agony — activism.

 

gofundme.com

Gofundme.com pages proliferated almost as soon as cops took Nikolas Cruz into custody after Wednesday’s 17-death massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland. Donors must parse the funding pages from the fraudulent.

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

Since the shooting at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School, alumni from around the country are coming back home.

They say in this painful moment for their community they have to be present.

Chelsea Tyrell graduated from Stoneman Douglas High in 2016. When she heard about the shooting at her alma mater she drove from the University of North Florida with her golden retriever.

"I thought I'd bring along my 6-year-old golden retriever who's certified as a therapy dog to just come out here if anyone needs any comfort," she said.

Susan Atocker / Sun Sentinel

When James and Kimberly Snead took in Nikolas Cruz late last year, he was a socially awkward teenager lost in the world, depressed by the death of his beloved mother.

But to the Sneads, Cruz appeared to be progressing.

The young man who had been friendly with their son regularly attended adult-education classes, bicycled to his job as a cashier and watched TV shows with the family. Cruz hoped to become an infantry soldier. With the Sneads’ help, the emotionally troubled 19-year-old planned to resume mental-health therapy begun years earlier.

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

State lawmakers are facing renewed pressure to pass gun control legislation following last week’s mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland — and the Legislature is only scheduled to be in session for another two and a half weeks after it returns from the Presidents' Day recess.

State Sen. Gary Farmer, who represents nearby Fort Lauderdale, is pushing the Legislature’s Republican leadership to hear bills he and his Democratic colleagues have introduced in past years.

Kate Stein / WLRN

Students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School are organizing protests pushing for legislative action on guns and mental health.

One protest is scheduled for Wednesday in Tallahassee. It will be the 43rd day of the regular legislative session. The high schoolers say they’re going to push state legislators to revise gun laws before the scheduled end of the law-writing session in three weeks.

Caitie Switalski / WLRN

Three days after 17 students and staff at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland were killed in the deadliest high school shooting in U.S. history, a Miami gun show went on as planned. 

 

Florida Gun Show puts on gun shows throughout the year across the state. 

Peter Haden / WLRN

The FBI ignored a tip last month that the accused Majory Stoneman Douglas High School killer was dangerous and at risk of committing a school shooting.

Seventeen people died in the attack.

Pages