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C.M. Guerrero / El Nuevo Herald

With Tropical Storm Erika on a course to barrel into Florida, Gov. Rick Scott on Friday declared a state of emergency for the entire state.

The executive order pointed to updated forecasts from the National Hurricane Center indicating the storm likely will "travel up the spine of Florida's peninsula." Erika is now expected to remain a tropical storm, rather than turn into a more-powerful hurricane.

Creative Commons

With a large aging population, Florida is an epicenter of Alzheimer’s cases in the United States. Roughly half a million people in the state live with the disease and by 2025, that number is projected to increase by 44 percent.

Mount Sinai Medical Center in Miami Beach and University of Florida Health just got 1.5 million in funding from the National Institutes of Health to run the only full-time Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center in the state to try and combat these numbers.

Nadege Green / WLRN

This is a story about a mermaid.

A vigilante-environmentalist mermaid, and she can't stay quiet any longer. She needs people to stop polluting South Florida’s waters.

“She’s the daughter of the goddess of the sea known as Yemaya in Cuba and the Caribbean,” says Elizabeth Doud.

In her one-woman show, Doud transforms into Siren Jones, the mermaid.

Mike Echevarria / Florida Aquarium

Submerged 250 to 300 feet in the Gulf of Mexico lies a coral reef that could hold the key to crucial information and resources for the Florida Keys reef. 

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration research cruise is currently operating at Pulley Ridge, 100 miles west of Key West, where scientists are using a remotely operated vehicle to collect videos and samples from the sea floor.

When the Lime Grove subdivision in Key West was created in 1941, the legal document laying out the lots included some restrictions.

One of them says this: "No race or nationality, other than those of the Caucasian race, shall use or occupy any building or any lot." The restriction makes an exception for domestic servants.

The U.S. Supreme Court outlawed such discriminatory rules in 1948 and it has not been enforced. But it's still on the books.

Florida Remains in Path of Tropical Storm Erika

Aug 26, 2015
NOAA

Ten years to the week that Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast after making initial landfall in Florida, another storm appears to be bearing down on the Sunshine State.

As of Wednesday afternoon, Tropical Storm Erika is less than five days from potential landfall in the state and nearly all of Florida’s east coast lies within the cone of uncertainty.

At the state Emergency Operations Center in Tallahassee, things are still relatively quiet right now, but the center has been partially activated in advance of the storm.

Creative Commons via Flickr / Phil Hilfiker (https://flic.kr/p/ziW5x)

South Florida commuters are wasting a lot of time stuck in snarled traffic.

That’s probably not a big surprise, but the area does not make the top ten list for the most gridlocked commute times according to the 2015 Urban Mobility Scorecard from the Texas Transportation Institute.

These most recent numbers put the average time a South Floridian spends languishing in traffic at 52 hours. That’s an hour increase from the previous year and has increased since 2010. 

South Florida is ranked 12th overall for the worst commuter traffic.

Citizens Insurance CEO: Rate Hike Due To Spike In Water Claims

Aug 25, 2015
maxstrz / Flickr Creative Commons

A "disturbing" rise in water-damage claims in South Florida is driving Citizens Property Insurance Corp. to seek an average 3.2 percent increase in rates for many homeowners, the president of the state-backed insurer said Tuesday.

  Without the surge in reported residential water damage over the past two years, which is causing the agency to alter its approach to such claims,Citizens would be asking for an average statewide rate decrease, Citizens President and CEO Barry Gilway said during a rate hearing before the Office of Insurance Regulation.

Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology

Remember Hurricane Danny roaring out in the Atlantic last week with 115-mile-an-hour gusts? When it reached Puerto Rico this morning it was wheezing.

That’s a big relief for the Caribbean islands – but it also reflects a big problem out there.

The same abnormal climate conditions that helped deflate Danny are also responsible for the some of the worst drought the Caribbean has seen in two decades.

RELATED: The Danger Of Hurricane Complacency

U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Admit it, some of you were watching every single update on Hurricane Danny. Your heart perhaps skipped a beat or two every time the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration kept boosting Danny all the way up to a category three.

As of this post, Monday afternoon, Danny had winds up to 30 mph and was expected to bring a few inches of rain to Puerto Rico and Haiti this week.

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