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StateImpact Florida
6:21 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

Students React To The Closure Of A Giant For-Profit College

An Everest Institute campus in Boston. Parent company Corinthian Colleges is closing Massachusetts campuses, but selling Florida campuses.
Credit Kirk Carapezza / WGBH

After a long reign as the fastest-growing and most problematic sector in higher education, for-profit colleges are on the ropes.

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Southernmost Housing
5:32 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

Some Homes May Be Too Old For Key West's Old Town

This home at 904 Emma St. is owned by the Key West Housing Authority.
Credit Nancy Klingener / WLRN

You can’t just tear down a house in Key West’s Historic District. Even if it’s in pretty bad shape. That’s why people were so surprised when the city -- which normally enforces the preservation rules -- came up with a list of five houses in Old Town that could be torn down.

One of those houses “looks like it’s sitting on limestone piers which are not anchored on anything , so the building’s sitting here unsecured,” says Ron Wampler, the city’s chief building official.

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Health
5:04 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

South Florida Health Center Receives $2 Million Grant Under the Affordable Care Act

Thirteen medical residents started their training on July 1.
Credit Community Health of South Florida

Community of Health of South Florida received a $2 million grant to train primary physicians. The center is the first in the state to receive funding from the Health Resource and Services Administration.  

Thirteen medical residents started a training program this month to meet the needs of many patients newly insured under the Affordable Care Act.

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Environment
3:49 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

Corps Of Engineers Hopes To Accelerate Permit Process To Protect Endangered Species

In South Florida, marine species are at the top of the endangered species list.
Credit Wikimedia / Creative Commons

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has a controversial history in Florida -- especially when it comes to the Everglades and the state’s wildlife.  

But now, the agency wants Floridians to know they’re working harder to protect endangered species.  

Each year the Corps of Engineers receives requests for various projects to build on regulated wetlands or the coast.  

The agency tries to issue half of those permits within 120 days.

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Health Care
3:22 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

Florida First In Medicaid Coverage For Mentally Ill

Florida is rolling out new Medicaid plans specifically for people with severe mental health diagnoses.
Credit Creative Commons of Charles Bell's Anatomy of the Brain, c. 1802 / Flickr user Shaheen Lakhan

  This month, Florida became the first state to offer a Medicaid plan dedicated to people who are diagnosed with severe mental health disorders.

It’s part of a larger move by the state’s Medicaid officials to move coverage towards a managed care system. It means one organization takes care of and coordinates all of a person’s health care needs: no more separate dental, vision, and internal medicine plans.

Mental health issues are almost twice as prevalent among Medicaid recipients than in the general population.

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Housing
7:19 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

Little Havana Development Gives Homes To Nearly 200 People

Amistad is the newest affordable housing development from Carrfour Supportive Housing and Pinnacle Housing Group
Credit Wilson Sayre

 

Almost 200 people now have a place to call home in an affordable housing development just opened in Little Havana.

In addition to a roof, kitchens and beds for low-income and formerly homeless people, Amistad’s 89 apartments offer supportive housing services:

“We do case management, we do employment and training services, we do life-skills training, we do parenting-skills trainings, we do activities with the kids,” says Stephanie Berman, president of Carrfour Supportive Housing.

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Latin America Report
7:11 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

How Panama Cut Poor Kids Out Of A Florida Millionaire's Will

BEQUEST BATTLE: Impoverished children in Panama.
Credit Appropriate Projects

Panama today is best known for its economic boom, and rightly so. But unfortunately, poverty and piracy remain as much a part of the country's image as the Panama Canal.

According to the World Bank, half of Panama’s children are poor. A fifth of them are malnourished. Those underfed kids cram Panama charity centers like Nutre Hogar. On a recent visit there I saw the devastating effects of child malnutrition, including brain damage.

“We don’t only feed them,” one Nutre Hogar staff member told me. “We spend a lot of time repairing their motor skills.”

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Miami
6:58 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

Liberty City Community To Protest Recent Shootings

Miami police are investigating a shooting in Liberty City that left two people dead. Up to 10 people were shot. The shooting happened in the 6500 block of Northwest 12th Avenue.
Credit WALTER MICHOT / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

Miami's Liberty City community will rally in an anti-violence protest on Saturday. The residents will gather in response to a recent mass shooting that left two dead and five injured.

Since the mass shooting in June, a man riding on his bicycle was shot dead and 67-year-old Pastor Kenneth Johnson was also murdered in the neighborhood. Johnson was attacked by two young men who tried to steal money out of his hand and a gold-plated chain from around his neck.

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StateImpact Florida
4:02 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

Why Miami-Dade Might Start Some High School Classes Later In The Morning

New research provides some support for Florida school leaders who want high schools to start later.
Credit Diana Schnuth / Flickr

Blame science – and not your teenager – if they’re slow starters in the morning.

Teenagers just can't get eight hours of sleep if high schools starts much before 8 a.m.

University of Minnesota researcher Kyla Wahlstrom said that's because adolescents go through something called the sleep phase shift.

"Teenagers are basically unable to fall asleep on a regular basis every night,"Wahlstrom said, "say, before 10:45 or 11. It’s just a biologic almost impossibility.”

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News
3:51 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

FEC Unveils New Rail Assembly-Line Facility At Port Everglades

Credit Jephie Bernard / WLRN

Florida East Coast Railway unveiled its new assembly-line facility for making trains at Port Everglades on Monday.

The site will also serve as as a port for housing those trains.

The Intermodal Container Transfer Facility, or ICTF, is a public-private venture among Florida East Coast Railway, Broward County and the state of Florida.

The partners say it should be a more efficient train-assembly plant and operations at the train yard will start on Wednesday.

The ICTF took 18 months to complete the project which is expected to provide over 200,000 jobs.

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News
3:47 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

Climate Change: Environmental Group Asks "What's Your Plan, Gov?"

The NRDC thinks a shift away from fossil fuels and toward clean energy is the best way to protect Florida from climate change.
Credit Ben Grantham/Flickr

The federal government released the third National Climate Assessment in May.

The report found that global sea level rose about eight inches in the last century and is projected to rise between one and four feet this century. 

It names Miami as one of the cities most vulnerable to severe damage from rising sea levels. 

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Miami Heat
11:23 am
Tue July 15, 2014

LeBron's Move In 9 Haikus

A haiku from Hialeah Haikus
Credit Hialeah Haikus / Courtesy

We read your haiku
about LeBron James leaving.
Thanks for the poems.

In 2010, WLRN and the Miami Herald collected poems to welcome the arrival of LeBron James to the Miami Heat. It's fitting to say goodbye to one of the Heat's celebrated players in verse again.

Fans from all over the Heat Nation shared their disappointment, their understanding and their (mostly) well wishes for James' new journey. Here are nine haikus that are our favorites.

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Local Elections
1:14 am
Tue July 15, 2014

Former North Miami Mayor Awaiting Trial For Fraud Endorses Candidate

From left to right: Jean Marcellus, Kevin Burns and Dr. Smith Joseph

North Miami’s elections are typically drama-filled.

The upcoming mayoral election, triggered after former mayor Lucie Tondreau was arrested by federal agents and removed from office, is no different.

Three candidates are vying to replace Tondreau: Jean Rodrigue Marcellus, a former city councilman, Kevin Burns, a former two-term mayor and Dr. Smith Joseph, a local physician. All three men are familiar faces to voters; they ran for mayor last election against Tondreau.

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Summer Fruit
7:08 pm
Mon July 14, 2014

International Mango Festival Uses Auction As Education

Some mangos on display at the auction during the International Mango Festival.
Credit Carla Javier / WLRN

Over the weekend, the Fairchild Tropical Botanical Garden hosted the 22nd annual International Mango Festival.

The highlight of the festival was what organizers say is the world's only mango auction.

But according to Dr. Richard Campbell, director of horticulture at Fairchild and auction co-host, the festival is not just for buying and selling mango products. It's educational.

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LeBron James
6:53 pm
Mon July 14, 2014

Burger Formerly Known As "Bron" Is Now "Gone"

The Gone burger was formerly known as the Bron burger.
Credit Carla Javier / WLRN

A local restaurant called OneBurger in Coral Gables created the Bron Burger back when LeBron James first announced he was leaving the Cleveland Cavaliers to play for the Miami Heat.

The ingredients are listed on a big sign on the wall:

  • Kaiser roll ("Kaiser is the German word for king.")
  • Kobe beef ("Cuz Bron eats Kobe for dinner.")
  • Swiss cheese
  • Onion ring ("Brother gonna wear some rings," the sign reads.)
  • Barbecue sauce
  • Mustard
  • Jalapeños ("Dude loves the heat")

Well...

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