Roberto Koltun / El Nuevo Herald

Last week, the House of Representatives voted to set up more barriers for Syrian refugees trying to get into the U.S. South Florida lawmakers are divided largely along part lines in the debate.

For some South Florida lawmakers, the debate over what to do with Syrian refugees is more personal than for others. Republican Congresswoman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen says she remembers fleeing Cuba decades ago.

John O'Connor / StateImpact Florida

As soon as the fourth and fifth graders at Natural Bridge Elementary were handed the lyrics to "Amazing Grace," they were ready to sing out.

But first, they needed a lesson in the four voice types of a choir – bass, tenor, alto and soprano.

One by one members of the group added their part while the students waited to sing the melody. Finally, it was time to add soprano Sara Guttenberg

“I really hope she sings the melody,” tenor Patrick Muehleise told the kids.

The students are ready. They join in before the conductor gives them their cue.

Jim Wyss / Miami Herald

In response to the Paris attacks one week ago, Florida Gov. Rick Scott joined more than half of the nations governors who called for "extensive" screening of Syrian migrants entering the United States.

One of the attackers who carried out the terrorist attacks in Paris that left more than 120 people dead appeared to be using a fake Syrian passport.

Sammy Mack / WLRN

Exhibits throughout the Miami Children’s Museum turned into makeshift courtrooms Friday as part of a National Adoption Day event.

More than 60 children had their adoptions finalized at the museum.

“It means we are complete, our little puzzle pieces are all there,” said Alexis Capin, who legally adopted her daughter, Eve, at the event. “Nothing’s missing—we have our little boy, our little girl—and we’re the perfect little family.”



It feels like a high-speed chase west on the ironically named Dolphin Expressway, veering south on what follows as a seamless string of highway on the "Palmetto," the Don Shula Expressway and the Ronald Reagan Turnpike, all certifiable assaults on the nervous system.

State Archives of Florida

What does Cyrus Teed have in common with people like Marjorie Rawlings, Ernest Hemingway, Henry Flagler and Juan Ponce de Leon? 

He was not from Florida. But he came to Florida, like the names listed above, and left an indelible mark on the state's history. 

The first thing you should know about Teed is that he was likely a lunatic. Or so thought many of the people who challenged him in the 19th and early 20th century. And by challenging, I mean people who wanted to fight, sue or even kill Teed.

Richard Blanco's poem for President Obama's second inauguration, "One Today," just came out as a children's book, with illustrations by Captain Underpants creator Dav Pilkey (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers).

Blanco is a poet and a civil engineer and says in the right brain/left brain equation, he uses both sides in equal measure. He recently spent some time with us talking about his own childhood. 


  The marine environments of Cuba and the U.S. have always shared the same resources.

Now the managers of marine protected areas in both countries will start sharing information.

This week the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the National Park Service signed an agreement with Cuba's Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Workers at the Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood and Miami international airports joined with others across the country to fight for better working conditions Thursday. Workers at JFK and LaGuardia airports in New York, Boston Logan, Chicago O'Hare and others joined in on the strike.

Most were pushing for higher wages, but the workers in South Florida wanted to send a message that the fight continues even after getting better pay.