News

Pages

Americas
11:50 am
Tue May 21, 2013

Why TV's 'Modern Family' Is A Setback For Latinas

Actress Sofia Vergara (right) in a scene from the upcoming season finale of the hit ABC show, Modern Family.
Credit abc.go.com

I am not a Latina. I am a middle-aged white guy whose salsa dancing embarrasses my Venezuelan-born wife. But because she is a Latina, and because my teen-aged daughter is half Latina, I take more than passing interest in how popular culture portrays Latinas. And these days I’m annoyed, because the most popular Latina image out there is, well, almost as embarrassing as my salsa dancing.

It’s an image, in fact, that represents a setback for Latinas.

Read more
Local Food
8:51 am
Tue May 21, 2013

Lutherans Help Urban Farm Take Root In Fort Lauderdale

Artist rendering of the proposed Flagler Village Community Garden in Fort Lauderdale.
Credit flaglergarden.org

Like many young professionals, 30-year-old Chad Scott had second thoughts about his job.

He was a CPA with accounting giant Ernest & Young for more than six years before becoming an internal auditor with Miami-based Burger King International. But something was missing.

"I wanted a life I could live without anxiety," said the Pembroke Pines native, recalling all the times he was chained to a desk during tax season and wouldn't see the sun for days.

Read more
Botany
7:14 am
Tue May 21, 2013

How Plants Tell The Story Of Florida's Immigrant History

A moringa tree, native to India, is one of several Indian plants cultivated by Laura Mani originally from Kerala.
Mihail Halatchev

Immigrants have had a profound effect on South Florida. We all know about the influences on culture, food and language. But they changed the region's horticulture too.

Many of South Florida's plants have been brought here to improve the surrounds, provide food and shelter. Indeed, most of the plants that we consider iconic to South Florida are not native but transplants from elsewhere. Bougainvillea? It's a native of Mexico. Mangoes are originally from India. Even that most Floridian of fruits, oranges, are originally from China.

Read more
Science
6:01 am
Tue May 21, 2013

Defense Department Funds Miami Project To Thwart Cyberattacks

Six FIU students were selected to participate in cyberspace internships at Point Mugu Naval Base in Southern California and Georgia Tech Research Institute in Atlanta. From left to right, Himanshu Upadhyay, ARC IT program lead, Christopher Lopez, Jon Carvajal, Tiffany Arrazola, Steven Lopez, Michael Garcia and Dr. Leonel Lagos, director of research for ARC.

In the next few months, Florida International University researchers will be doing their part to prevent the kind of high-tech cyberattacks that could cripple financial institutions, disable major infrastructure or threaten national security.

  The Department of Defense plans to provide seed funding of $150,000 to FIU’s Applied Research Center (ARC) to launch a cybersecurity test technology program. The project’s goal is to develop new technology to help thwart cyberattacks and cyberterrorism.

Read more
Politics
2:59 pm
Mon May 20, 2013

Gov. Scott Signs Florida Budget; Explains Vetoes

Gov. Rick Scott signs the 2013-14 state budget. He told reporters he vetoed a tuition hike because it will help Florida families.
Credit Tom Urban/News Service of Florida

Gov. Rick Scott signed the 2013-14 state budget into law today.

He also sent a letter to Secretary of State Ken Detzner explaining his decision to veto a tuition hike. “We are also holding the line on tuition by vetoing the Legislature’s recommended 3 percent tuition increase on our college and university students,” the governor wrote.

Read more
Community Contributor
9:11 am
Mon May 20, 2013

Miami's Acceptance Of Syrian Immigrant Inspires Verse

We’ve asked a few of the authors of standout poems for our That’s So Miami project to explain the inspiration behind their work. Find the winners of our contest and more entries here.

Black and white

Chinese and Cuban

Who would’ve thought

My bestfriend would be Russian?

That’s so Miami.

Read more
The Sunshine Economy
9:00 am
Mon May 20, 2013

The Sunshine Economy Part Three: Real Estate

Special correspondent Tom Hudson hosts a weekly series on The Sunshine Economy, a fresh take on the key industries driving growth across South Florida.
Credit WLRN

 

REAL ESTATE

From world famous beaches to international trade flows, South Florida has become one of the world's most vibrant and diverse economies.

Through a series of one-hour radio programs, special correspondent Tom Hudson hosts a weekly radio show on Mondays in May and June exploring The Sunshine Economy, a fresh take on the key industries driving growth across South Florida.

Topic & Guests: South Florida's economy is underpinned by the local real estate market, which is influenced by global trends.

Read more
Politics
8:02 pm
Sun May 19, 2013

Gov. Scott Vetoes Student Tuition Hike

Gov. Rick Scott of Florida
Credit Flickr/Creative Commons

Gov. Rick Scott on Monday signed a $74.1 billion budget for the fiscal year that starts July 1 and vetoed $368 million in projects.


Scott vetoed 3 percent tuition increases for universities and state colleges and also rejected numerous spending proposals, including $14 million sought by Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, for a project at Gulf Coast State College in Panama City.


In a budget message, Scott touted that the spending plan includes $480 million to raise teacher pay.

Read more
Arts
8:00 am
Sun May 19, 2013

The Broward Center - Past and Present

The Broward Center for the Performing Arts has become an important part of South Florida's cultural landscape.  Here's some memories from two people who have long  histories with this organization.

Read more
Norman Van Aken's A Word On Food
8:00 am
Sat May 18, 2013

The Real Deal Story Behind The Cuban Boniato

Credit enenutricio.wordpress.com/

Back in the late 1990‘s at the original NORMAN’S restaurant in Coral Gables we had a young man who became our Lunch Chef named Eliecer Garcia. Like many young chefs he was very interested in cuisines from all over and when we talked about what to put on our lunch menu his ideas ranged from France to Hong Kong. I loved that but sometimes I’d say, “Eliecer. I want you to show me flavors your Cuban Grandmother would make and then we can twist them a little. Okay? Why don’t you show me how she would cook with … oh… boniato for instance? And then we’ll go from there.” 

Read more
Evenin' Jazz
8:33 pm
Fri May 17, 2013

Leon Foster Thomas Finds His Voice

Pannist Leon Foster Thomas

  Leon Foster Thomas grew up in a musical household in Trinidad but steel pan  didn't appeal to him - at first. Ultimately the young percussionist taught himself to play the island's official instrument and found it's the best way to express himself.  Thomas talks about his musical journey from Trinidad to South Florida and beyond, details some steel pan history, and shares what it's like to be both a working musician and doting dad.

Read more
Environment
4:13 pm
Fri May 17, 2013

South Florida's New Science Center And Aquarium

The South Florida Science Museum before its makeover.
Credit Courtesy photo / South Florida Science Museum

What's in a name change? Plenty, when the new moniker also signals an "emotional change," as is the case with the soon-to-be-unveiled South Florida Science Center and Aquarium. The entity is a rebranding of the popular South Florida Science Museum. The longtime Palm Beach County institution hasn't received a makeover since its completion in 1969 (which represents an eternity in a region that is eager to "spruce up appearances" on the regular.) 

Read more
Real Estate
4:07 pm
Fri May 17, 2013

Old Miami Arena Site Gets New Plans; Here's A Timeline Of The Property

Professional skateboarder Danny Fuenzalida kick-flips over recently paved and painted bench bumps.
Credit @Matt_Roy on Instagram

Did you know that if you dig deep enough into the property records of any piece of real estate in the state of Florida you will find that all the land originally belonged to the Spanish Crown?

But ever since the Adams-Onis Treaty of 1821, land ownership has been like a hot potato, changing hands incessantly.  Indeed, taking a deep look into any one piece of property (likely where you live, included) will reveal a surreal story for the ages.

Read more
Youth Culture
12:36 pm
Fri May 17, 2013

How Social Media Changed High School's Biggest Night

Miami-Dade high school seniors Adam Tzur and Natalie Hoberman.
Credit Alexis Winer

Earlier this spring, a typical school day turned into something a lot more memorable for one student at Dr. Michael M. Krop Senior High School near Aventura.

It’s April. Natalie Hoberman was sitting in her advanced placement government class.

“It was one of my hardest classes," she said.

Read more
The Florida Roundup
12:00 pm
Fri May 17, 2013

Does The Governor Deserve Credit For The Economy?

The state announced that the jobless rate dropped to 7.2 percent in April 2013. But what kind of jobs have been created?
Credit quite peculiar / Creative Commons/Flickr

On The Florida Roundup, we take a special look at the economy.  

Employment, tourism and real estate numbers suggest a recovery. We’ll examine whether Gov. Rick Scott’s “it’s working” motto is actually working -- for him.

Meanwhile, the legislative session is over but many bills are still under review by the governor. The biggest: Florida's $74.5 billion budget.

And locally, could South Florida lose both the Super Bowl and the International Swimming Hall of Fame to California?

Read more

Pages