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Katie Lepri / WLRN

This week on The Florida Roundup...

News of the death of Fidel Castro set in motion celebrations in the streets on Miami, but it also gave rise to complex emotions across generations for Cuban-Americans and others in South Florida. We look at the reactions, as well as how South Florida media prepared for years to cover this story. 

As his ashes make his way from Havana to Santiago, we speak with WLRN's Americas correspondent Tim Padgett about reactions to Fidel's death in the island. 

Jessica Meszaros / WGCU News

People in Southwest Florida are having a new and sometimes uncomfortable kind of conversation at the dinner table… about death.

 

Medical professionals say most people are not preparing for their deaths. And this usually leaves families scrambling to make choices for their loved ones. So to fix that, there’s this worldwide initiative called Death Over Dinner. 

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Buffing is what it’s called when you paint over someone else's work, erasing it. The Buff Daddy has been doing this for decades and he’s the guy people won’t see as they flock to Wynwood this Miami Art Week to see the new street art that’s going up on the walls of stores and warehouses.

Katie Lepri / WLRN

The crowd filled two city blocks near a memorial dedicated to soldiers who died in the Bay of Pigs Invasion in 1961.

They danced to a Celia Cruz cover of “I will survive” and chanted "libertad, libertad, libertad." 

For many in Miami's Cuban-American exile community, the pain of Fidel Castro's rule, and the joy of his death, are deeply personal. Less than a week after the reviled and revered Cuban revolutionary passed, Little Havana continued to celebrate life after Fidel with a rally on Calle Ocho. 

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

Florida Keys Community College established a mariculture program six years ago, after the movie "Finding Nemo" created a craze for clownfish like the title character.

But it wasn't until Mick Walsh arrived three years ago to head up the college's marine environmental technology department that the program took off.

"When I got here, we had eight pairs of parent fish and that was it," Walsh said. "And now we have eight pairs of parent fish and hundreds, hundreds of baby clownfish and many more that have also been adopted out to community members and students."

Neil Case

When you sit in the passenger seat of DJ Billy E’s sky-blue van and he turns a few nobs on the console, tens of thousands of watts of bass are pushed out from a wall of subwoofers behind your head and crash down, not just on your ears, but on your entire body. It makes every little nose hair dance around and tickle. It’s hard to breathe there’s so much pressure. It is absolutely thrilling.

WLRN

Whether it was on a radio piece, a long-form documentary or in a casual conversation at the office, Alan Tomlinson was first and foremost a storyteller. An astute observer of the human condition, at the heart of his work there was always a sincere concern for  the disadvantaged, the vulnerable and a hatred for injustice and unnecessary suffering. 

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

HAVANA - Hundreds of thousands of Cubans filled Havana’s Revolution Square Tuesday night to bid farewell to Fidel Castro, who died Friday. We can’t know how many of them will actually miss the communist leader. But some of the mourners are not who you’d expect.

Balthazira / Flickr Creative Commons

Two weeks before Election Day, Donald Trump made a campaign promise during a rally in Collier County that Floridians have been hearing from politicians for years:

"A Trump administration will also work alongside you to restore and protect the beautiful Everglades,” said Trump.

The Everglades restoration isn't the only environmental issue facing Florida. Sea-level rise also remains a serious threat here. 

The man leading the fight against unscrupulous sober homes has a message for state legislators.

“When the appropriations process comes up, please keep us in mind,” said Palm Beach County State Attorney Dave Aronberg at a meeting with the Palm Beach County Legislative Delegation in Boca Raton Tuesday.

Katie Lepri / WLRN

 

The sheet music for Symphony No. I-95 includes musical notations like ‘wipers on’ and ‘sustained honk.’

It’s a live performance that remakes traffic noises — beeps, honks, engines revving — into an organized orchestral production with cars.   

This is what artist and musician Steve Parker calls an "automobile choir."

Courtesy Knight Foundation

Miami Arts Week started with good news for the whole region, with the announcements of the winners of the 2016 Knights Arts Challenge. 

The contest, sponsored by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, will give $2.78 million to 44 local  artists and projects aimed at exploring the authentic voices of South Florida and bringing art to neighborhoods from Key West to Palm Beach. All winners have committed to find funds to match Knight's commitment (it's one of the conditions of the grant). 

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

HAVANA - When the first commercial flight between the U.S. and Cuba in more than half a century touched down in Santa Clara in August, the JetBlue plane from Fort Lauderdale was met with cheers and water-cannon salutes.

When the first commercial flight between Miami and Havana in more than half a century landed at José Martí International Airport Monday morning, the American Airlines 737 taxied quietly to the terminal and unloaded 125 passengers wearing complimentary straw fedoras.

No confetti. No music. And it felt remarkably fitting.

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

HAVANA - While Miami mostly celebrated Fidel Castro’s death, in Havana the mood is much more somber – nine days of duelo, or mourning. 

Tom Hudson

Fidel Castro may be dead, but his shadow lurks over the Cuban economy even as it absorbs -- oftentimes resists -- the biggest changes in its relationship with the U.S. in more than a half century. At the same time, a new American president-elect has promised to extract more freedoms and restitution from Cuba if the new economic engagement is to continue. The Sunshine Economy looks at this double challenge in the economic dealings between South Florida and the island.

 

 

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