nuclear http://wlrn.org en 5 Myths About Nuclear Weapons http://wlrn.org/post/5-myths-about-nuclear-weapons <p></p><p><font face="Calibri,sans-serif" size="2" style="line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: 11pt;"><font face="Times New Roman,serif" size="4"><span style="font-size: 14pt;">06/04/13 - Tuesday's&nbsp;</span></font><strong><a href="https://twitter.com/topicalcurrents"><font face="Times New Roman,serif" size="4"><span style="font-size: 14pt;">Topical Currents</span></font></a></strong><font face="Times New Roman,serif" size="4"><span style="font-size: 14pt;">&nbsp;is with nuclear historian <strong><a href="https://twitter.com/WardHayesWilson">Ward Wilson</a></strong>, author of&nbsp;</span></font><font face="Times New Roman,serif" size="4"><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><i><strong><a href="http://amzn.to/11h4UXu">FIVE MYTHS ABOUT NUCLEAR WEAPONS</a></strong>.&nbsp;</i></span></font></span></font><span style="line-height: normal; font-size: 14pt; font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif;">Millions of American baby-boomers grew up haunted by the possibility of nuclear annihilation.&nbsp; After negotiations in the </span>1980s<span style="line-height: normal; font-size: 14pt; font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif;">, both US and Soviet nuclear stockpiles were reduced.&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: normal; font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 14pt;">Wilson says the idea that that nuclear weapons have created a deterrence to war and contributed to negotiations is misleading.&nbsp;</span><font face="Times New Roman,serif" size="4" style="line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: 14pt;">That’s&nbsp;</span></font><a href="https://www.facebook.com/TopicalCurrents" style="font-family: 'Segoe UI', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;"><font face="Times New Roman,serif" size="4"><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><b>Topical Currents&nbsp;</b></span></font></a><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Georgia, Times, serif; font-size: 15px; line-height: 22px;">at&nbsp;1pm on&nbsp;</span><a href="http://wlrn.org/schedule/WLRN" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 15px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(62, 72, 122); font-family: Georgia, Times, serif; line-height: 22px;"><b style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">WLRN-HD1</b></a><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Georgia, Times, serif; font-size: 15px; line-height: 22px;">&nbsp;rebroadcast at 7pm on&nbsp;</span><a href="http://wlrn.org/schedule/wlrn-hd2" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 15px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(62, 72, 122); font-family: Georgia, Times, serif; line-height: 22px;"><b style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">WLRN-HD2</b></a><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Georgia, Times, serif; font-size: 15px; line-height: 22px;">&nbsp;and audio on-demand after the live program.&nbsp;</span></p><p> Tue, 04 Jun 2013 17:00:00 +0000 Joseph Cooper, Bonnie Berman & Paul Leary 15140 at http://wlrn.org 5 Myths About Nuclear Weapons Plug To Be Pulled On Stricken Florida Nuke http://wlrn.org/post/plug-be-pulled-stricken-florida-nuke <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Disabled by bungled repair work more tan three years ago, Duke Energy's Crystal River nuclear power plant will not be reactivated, company officials have concluded.</span></p><p>The plant in Citrus County on Florida's west coast will become he first in the Southeastern U. S. to close.</p><p>Four coal-fired generators will remain in place at the Crystal River site and the company is considering whether to build a new natural gas generator to replace the energy that the 900-megawatt CR3 nuke has produced since it opened in 1977.</p> Wed, 06 Feb 2013 13:21:28 +0000 Rick Stone 8932 at http://wlrn.org Plug To Be Pulled On Stricken Florida Nuke Progress Energy's $100-Million Dilemma: Retire Or Repair Crystal River Nuclear Plant http://wlrn.org/post/progress-energys-100-million-dilemma-retire-or-repair-crystal-river-nuclear-plant <p></p><p>Still undecided about whether to repair or permanently shut down an idled nuclear-power plant, Progress Energy Florida faces the likelihood of eventually refunding up to $100 million to customers.</p><p>The refunds stem from a wide-ranging settlement agreement that Progress reached in early 2012 with representatives of consumers and business groups. Under that settlement, the utility would not have been subject to refunding money if it started repairs on the Crystal River nuclear plant by Dec. 31.</p> Tue, 08 Jan 2013 14:00:00 +0000 Jim Saunders 7414 at http://wlrn.org Progress Energy's $100-Million Dilemma: Retire Or Repair Crystal River Nuclear Plant