language http://wlrn.org en Bad English, Good Humor, LOL, And Many Surprises, OMG! http://wlrn.org/post/bad-english-good-humor-lol-and-many-surprises-omg <div style="font-family: 'Segoe UI', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; margin: 0px;"></div><div style="font-family: 'Segoe UI', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; margin: 0px;"><font face="Calibri,sans-serif" size="2"><span style="font-size: 11pt;"><font face="Times New Roman,serif" size="4"><span style="font-size: 14pt;">06/25/14 - Wednesday's&nbsp;</span></font><a href="https://twitter.com/topicalcurrents"><font face="Times New Roman,serif" size="4"><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><b>Topical Currents</b></span></font></a>< Wed, 25 Jun 2014 17:00:00 +0000 Bonnie Berman & Paul Leary 34525 at http://wlrn.org Bad English, Good Humor, LOL, And Many Surprises, OMG! Do You Sound Like You're From South Florida? Take The NYT Quiz http://wlrn.org/post/do-you-sound-youre-south-florida-take-nyt-quiz <p>Our Miami talk is markedly different from the Southern drawls heard farther north in the state, but even within the four South Florida counties, twangs and tones are varied.</p><p>The New York Times this week released a dialect map to show its readers how their speech lines up with their hometowns. A quiz asks readers how they pronounce words like "caramel" and "aunt," and the answers generate a color coded map, which also highlights three of the cities whose residents speak most like the quiz taker.</p> Thu, 26 Dec 2013 13:01:44 +0000 Maria Murriel 25594 at http://wlrn.org Do You Sound Like You're From South Florida? Take The NYT Quiz Talk To The Head Honcho; He Speaks Japanese http://wlrn.org/post/talk-head-honcho-he-speaks-japanese Picture the "head honcho" of an organization and what comes to mind are boardrooms, power and wealth, an individual at the top of his or her game.<p>But where did the word "honcho" originate? Tue, 29 Oct 2013 15:35:23 +0000 22838 at http://wlrn.org Talk To The Head Honcho; He Speaks Japanese Why Academics Need To Chill Out About 'Text Talk,' Srsly http://wlrn.org/post/why-academics-need-chill-out-about-text-talk-srsly <p></p><p>For a few years now, teachers and English purists have bemoaned the slow, painful death of language. It was bad enough when only rock music and television were the enemy.</p><p>Today it's smartphones. In fact, in a recent article a professor bemoans to&nbsp;<a href="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/social-media/9813109/Art-of-essay-writing-damaged-by-Twitter-and-Facebook-Cambridge-don-warns.html"><u>The Telegraph</u></a> that social media network Twitter is causing students’ writing skills to “go down the plug hole.”</p> Thu, 29 Aug 2013 16:34:12 +0000 Neyda Borges 19769 at http://wlrn.org Why Academics Need To Chill Out About 'Text Talk,' Srsly Miami Accents: Why Locals Embrace That Heavy "L" Or Not http://wlrn.org/post/miami-accents-why-locals-embrace-heavy-l-or-not <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Michelle </span>Antelo<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> was born and raised in Miami but has never lived anywhere else. After learning Spanish at home from her Cuban parents, she always thought her English, which she learned at school, was up to American standards.</span></p><p>But, as many Miamians have learned, her way of speaking stuck out around people from places other than Miami. When Antelo was a cheerleader in high school, her Broward County teammates told her she sounded different.</p> Tue, 27 Aug 2013 11:00:00 +0000 Patience Haggin 19624 at http://wlrn.org Miami Accents: Why Locals Embrace That Heavy "L" Or Not Miami Accents: How 'Miamah' Turned Into A Different Sort Of Twang http://wlrn.org/post/miami-accents-how-miamah-turned-different-sort-twang <p></p><p></p><p>You might’ve heard it when you're out on the town, at Publix, or at that cafe down the street. Or, you might hear it when you open your own mouth.</p><p><strong><a href="http://wlrn.org/post/miami-accents-why-locals-embrace-heavy-l-or-not?nopop=1" target="_blank">RELATED: Miami Accents: Why Locals Embrace That Heavy "L" Or Not</a></strong></p> Mon, 26 Aug 2013 14:21:08 +0000 Gabriella Watts 18972 at http://wlrn.org Miami Accents: How 'Miamah' Turned Into A Different Sort Of Twang How I Learned To Swear In Cuban http://wlrn.org/post/how-i-learned-swear-cuban <p>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n59TEvACLqg</p> Thu, 08 Aug 2013 17:18:00 +0000 Luis Clemens 18727 at http://wlrn.org How I Learned To Swear In Cuban High Altitudes Help Languages Form In Different Ways, Study Finds http://wlrn.org/post/high-altitudes-help-languages-form-different-ways-study-finds <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Language is formed by giving meaning to sounds and stringing together these meaningful expressions to communicate feelings and ideas. Until recently most linguists believed that the relationship between the structure of language and the natural world was mainly the influence of the environment on vocabulary. Now, a new University of Miami study&nbsp;shows that there is a link between geographical elevation and the way language is spoken.&nbsp;</span></p> Tue, 25 Jun 2013 11:23:00 +0000 University of Miami 16038 at http://wlrn.org High Altitudes Help Languages Form In Different Ways, Study Finds Picking 2012's Word Of The Year http://wlrn.org/post/picking-2012s-word-year There is a major decision coming up that will truly define the year 2012. Yes, it's almost time for the American Dialect Society to once again vote on the Word of the Year. Will it be <em>selfie? Hate-watching?</em> <em>Superstorm? Double down? Fiscal cliff?</em> Or (shudder) <em>YOLO?</em><p>Ben Zimmer is a <a href="http://benzimmer.com/boston-globe/">language columnist</a> for <em>The Boston Globe</em> and chairman of the American Dialect Society's New Words Committee. Fri, 28 Dec 2012 19:13:52 +0000 editor 6945 at http://wlrn.org Picking 2012's Word Of The Year Language Expert Constance Hale: Let Verbs Power Your Writing http://wlrn.org/post/language-expert-constance-hale-let-verbs-power-your-writing <p></p><p>12/27/12 - Thursday’s&nbsp;<strong>Topical Currents</strong> begins with journalist and language expert Constance Hale.&nbsp; Her latest book concentrates on the “pivot points” of our sentences:&nbsp; verbs. &nbsp;In her book, <a href="http://amzn.to/ZBBFTI">VEX, HEX, SMASH, SMOOCH</a>, she examines both heavenly and headache verbs. &nbsp;And more.&nbsp; Linda Gassenheimer and wine columnist Fred Tasker&nbsp;with end of year drinks and food.</p> Thu, 27 Dec 2012 18:00:00 +0000 Joseph Cooper, Bonnie Berman, Paul Leary & Linda Gassenheimer 6885 at http://wlrn.org Language Expert Constance Hale: Let Verbs Power Your Writing