News

Food
8:02 am
Fri April 26, 2013

Exploring Coffee's Past To Rescue Its Future

Eduardo Somarriba is a researcher at the Center for Tropical Agricultural Research and Education in Turrialba, Costa Rica.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 3:47 pm

At the Center for Tropical Agricultural Research and Education (CATIE) in Turrialba, Costa Rica, you can touch the history of coffee — and also, if the optimists have their way, part of its future.

Here, spread across 25 acres, are coffee trees that take you back to coffee's origins.

"The story starts in Africa, no? East Africa," says Eduardo Somarriba, a researcher at CATIE, as we walk through long rows of small coffee trees.

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Corporate Run 2013
12:11 pm
Thu April 25, 2013

Thousands To Take Part In Miami's Mercedes-Benz Marathon

This year's Corporate Run logo.
Credit facebook.com/mercedesbenzcorporaterun

Up to 20,000 runners and walkers are expected to take part in Thursday evening’s annual Mercedes-Benz Corporate Run through downtown Miami — and that means street closures.

The race officially begins at 6:45 p.m. It concludes around 8 p.m. at Bayfront Park, but some closures on Biscayne Boulevard could begin as early as 2 p.m.

Motorists are encouraged to take alternate routes. Residents that live in the area will be allowed access on a “local traffic only” basis.

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Food
9:44 am
Thu April 25, 2013

Step Aside, Gents. Witness The Rise Of Women In Coffee

Three women in coffee leading the way: Stephanie Backus of Portland Roasting, coffee farmer Miguelina Villatoro of Guatemala, and coffee exporter/processor Loyreth Sosa. Here they discuss coffee prices as they survey beans ready for milling.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 3:49 pm

The inspiration for NPR's Coffee Week arrived in an email last summer. I had just reported on the growing Third-Wave Movement in Coffee, and the burgeoning interest in coffee cuppings.

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Entrepreneurship
6:00 am
Thu April 25, 2013

Get Rid Of Your Junk With A College Hunk

Miami franchise owners Christopher Poore (left) and Ron Rick (right).
Credit Steve Boxall

Twenty-three-year-old Christopher Poore opens the door with a warm and welcoming smile. He turns and walks back into his new office. A lounge area with couches and a wooden table are off to one side in front of a wall painted bright orange and green, the colors of his alma mater. 


His business partner Ron Rick ,23, enters the room sporting a buzz cut and green polo shirt with a muscle man logo on it. The two are laid-back entrepreneurs who became friends as undergraduates at the University of Miami.

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Great Outdoors
12:34 pm
Wed April 24, 2013

Florida's National Parks Are Free Through April 26

Sunrise on Long Pine Key Nature Trail.
Credit Wikimedia Commons

In celebration of National Parks Week, every national park in the United States is free of charge through Friday, April 26.

These include Everglades National Park and the Dry Tortugas National Park off of Key West.

For a complete list of Florida's National Parks, go to the website by clicking here.

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Food
11:19 am
Wed April 24, 2013

How Coffee Influenced The Course Of History

An overseer sits in the shade while workers collect coffee beans on a Brazilian plantation, circa 1750.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 3:49 pm

Coffee is a powerful beverage. On a personal level, it helps keep us awake and active. On a much broader level, it has helped shape our history and continues to shape our culture.

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History
11:06 am
Wed April 24, 2013

New Plan Preserves Jackie Gleason Theater In Miami Beach

The Jackie Gleason Theater in Miami Beach
Credit facebook.com/SaveTheFillmore

One of the most contentious aspects of the plan to redevelop the Miami Beach Convention Center has been settled: The Fillmore Miami Beach at the Jackie Gleason Theater will stay.

The theater had been slated for demolition by Portman-CMC, one of the two teams still in the running for the massive overhaul project. But with music and history lovers lined up in support of saving the theater, the team said that its plan has changed.

“We listened to the community,” said Jack Portman, vice chairman of Portman Holdings and John Portman & Associates.

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Food
10:34 am
Wed April 24, 2013

Coffee For A Cause: What Do Those Feel-Good Labels Deliver?

Luis Fernando Vasquez has been a coffee farmer in the central valley of Costa Rica his entire life.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 3:50 pm

What does it take to find guilt-free coffee?

Much of our coffee comes from places where the environment is endangered and workers earn very little — sometimes, just a few dollars for a whole day's work. Coffee farmers have helped cut down tropical forests, and most of them use pesticides.

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Nature
8:30 am
Tue April 23, 2013

Father Saves Boy From Alligator Attack, With A Stranger's Help

A Fish and Wildlife Service team caught and killed an alligator after the animal attacked a 6-year-old boy Friday. The boy survived with only incidental wounds.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 3:05 pm

A 6-year-old boy's day off from school Friday left him with a vivid story to tell his classmates, after he was seized — and eventually released — by an alligator in South Florida. The attack occurred at a wildlife refuge near Boynton Beach, Fla., where Joseph Welch had taken his son, Joey, for a canoe ride.

As Welch, a native of Rhode Island who now lives in Pompano Beach, says in a Morning Edition interview airing Tuesday, his idea had been to do "something new and different."

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News
7:00 am
Tue April 23, 2013

How Urban Explorers Record History South Florida Forgot

Aerojet Missle Silo (not to be confused with Nike Missile Silo, this facility is outside of the Everglades and not open to visitors)
Credit abandonedmuse.com

Built in 1964 as part of the Cold War response to the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Nike Missile Silo was abandoned in 1979, but the former complex remains eerily intact within the southern portion of Everglades National Park. It is a reminder of a time when South Florida was a focal point of international politics, and it's also one the region's more famous abandoned sites.

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Health Care
11:20 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Scammers Find Fertile Ground In Health Law

Confusion over the details of the new health care law is leaving many people vulnerable to con artists. Evelyne Lois Such, 86, was recently the target of an attempted scam.
Matt Nager for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 10:18 am

One recent morning, Evelyne Lois Such was sitting at her kitchen table in Denver when the phone rang. Such, who's 86, didn't recognize the phone number or the deep voice on the other end of the line.

"He asked, 'Are you a senior?' and I said yes, and he said, 'Well, we are sending out all new Medicare cards, and I want to make sure I have all your statistics just correct,' " Such recalls.

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Trade
10:09 am
Mon April 22, 2013

How Coffee Brings The World Together

The best coffee comes from high altitudes with a warm climate like in Huehuetenango, Guatemala.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 3:51 pm

Coffee is more than a drink. For many of us — OK, for me — it's woven into the fabric of every day.

It also connects us to far corners of the globe.

For instance, every Friday, a truck pulls up to the warehouse of Counter Culture Coffee, a small roaster and coffee distributor in Durham, N.C., and unloads a bunch of heavy burlap sacks.

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Journalism
6:00 am
Fri April 19, 2013

Pursuing Reckless Cops Wins Sun-Sentinel Its First Pulitzer

Sun-Sentinel Investigative Reporter Sally Kestin
Credit Christine DiMattei

It was a humdinger of a story.

A Miami police officer in a marked squad car is pursued, pulled over and handcuffed by a Florida state trooper after speeding down the turnpike like race car driver Dale Earnhardt, Jr.

A dash-cam video of that pre-dawn October chase in 2011 went viral and sparked a three-month investigation by the South Florida Sun-Sentinel newspaper into how local police officers routinely endangered the general public through reckless driving.

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Boston Marathon Bombings
3:21 pm
Wed April 17, 2013

A Love Letter To Boston By Way Of Miami

This photograph by Charles Porter of a OKC firefighter holding a dying infant won a Pulitzer Prize in 1996.
Credit Wikipedia

April 19th, 1995

My Louisville-born husband wakes up from a dream he just can't seem to shake. He knows, of course, that I'm an Oklahoma City girl, though many years removed. It's April. It's a tornado, he thinks. Oklahoma City has been hit, he thinks. I'll turn on the TV, he thinks. That something is wrong, he knows.  

"KELLLLLLLEY!!!!!"'  

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Environment
9:43 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Lionfish Attacking Atlantic Ocean Like A Living Oil Spill

Lionfish, like this one spotted in the Bahamas, are a nonnative predatory fish that can decimate native fish populations.
Cammy Clark MCT/Landov

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 1:45 pm

A gluttonous predator is power-eating its way through reefs from New York to Venezuela. It's the lionfish.

And although researchers are coming up with new ways to protect some reefs from the flamboyant maroon-striped fish, they have no hope of stopping its unparalleled invasion.

Lad Akins has scuba dived in the vibrant reefs of the Bahamas for many years. But when he returned a couple years ago, he saw almost no fish smaller than his hand.

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