News

Diversity
12:32 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Map Of South Florida Shows How Racially Segregated We Are

A new map clearly demarcates the racial divide in the United States through colorful dots, showing the demographics of South Florida and highlighting the striking partitions of how we live.

For example, most people know that Miami Beach is primarily a mix of white and Hispanic and that North Miami is mostly white east of Biscayne Boulevard and predominantly black on the west side. But there is more that can be read into the map.

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People
10:54 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Florida's Byler Sextuplets Turn Six Years Old

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 12:40 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Florida's first sextuplets turn 6 this week. And the Byler kids have also started kindergarten - each in separate classrooms.

Apparently, it's been a tough transition with a lot of tears. It's the first time the five brothers and one sister have been on their own since they were born. It also made more work for their mother. She had to bake 120 cupcakes so that each of the six children would have enough for each classroom party.

Health Care
10:41 am
Fri September 6, 2013

After A Decade, Congress Moves To Fix Doctors' Medicare Pay

I think I see the problem.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 7:59 am

Hear the words health care and Congress, and you think fight, right?

And you'd be forgiven, particularly because the House has now voted some 40 times in the past two years to repeal or otherwise undo portions of the Affordable Care Act.

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Civil Rights
2:46 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

How The March On Washington Lives On 50 Years Later For Those Who Weren't There

(Left to right) Tsitsi Wakhisi, Brenda Howard and Arberdella White-Davis.
Credit Tsitsi Wakhisi

For the hundreds of thousands of people who participated in the 1963 March on Washington, many can recount the moving moments of that day.

But for a particular group of four ladies, the impact of the event is still profoundly felt decades later. All were young teens at the time of Martin Luther King’s historic “I Have a Dream” speech, but didn’t attend the march.

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Politics
2:55 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

After The Zimmerman Verdict: How Juries Are Chosen In Florida

Should the jury in the George Zimmerman trial have been more diverse? Zimmerman (in the photo on the right) shot Trayvon Martin (left) in Sanford, Fla. but was acquitted for the killing.

The makeup of the George Zimmerman jury – six women, five of them white – got the attention of Sen. Gwen Margolis, D-Miami when the jury acquitted Zimmerman in the death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin of Sanford.

Margolis has filed a bill in Tallahassee that would require a 12-member jury for any felony case that might bring life in prison. (Twelve jurors are already required for death penalty cases.)

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Hurricane Season
2:47 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

This Is What It Sounds Like To Be In A Category 5 Hurricane

Hurricane Andrew in 1992 was the last Category 5 hurricane to hit the continental U.S.
Credit NOAA / Satellite and Information Service

 

We're now more than halfway through the Atlantic hurricane season and -- knock on wood -- no Atlantic hurricanes yet. Depending on how long this continues, 2013 stands a chance of setting a record for "Latest First Atlantic Hurricane" in history.

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Local History
2:44 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

How The Woman Behind Miami's Manhattan Cafe Witnessed The Downtown's Rebirth

Rosaly Guimaraes stands behind the counter of her Manhattan Cafe for the final time.

The year was 1995 and the place is on the cusp of a dilapidated downtown Miami at Northeast 14th Street and Biscayne Boulevard: parking lots located next to empty lots and patches of dusty grass that were home to those who had no other -- prostitutes, drug addicts, alcoholics and those who had simply given up.

It was back when the euphemism for Miami was South Florida, because like many a crime-ridden city, very few wanted to claim the name anymore.

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Environment
10:39 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Bald Eagles Are Back In A Big Way — And The Talons Are Out

Bryan Watts, a conservation biologist at the College of William and Mary, and biology graduate student Courtney Turrin, survey eagle behavior along the James River in late-summer.
Elizabeth Shogren NPR

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 8:48 pm

"It's a jungle if you're an eagle right now on the Chesapeake Bay," says Bryan Watts, a conservation biologist at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Va. "You have to watch your back."

Americans have long imagined their national symbol as a solitary, noble bird soaring on majestic wings. The birds are indeed gorgeous and still soar, but the notion that they are loners is outdated, Watts and other conservationists are finding.

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Americas
4:04 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Mexico Summons U.S. Ambassador, Seeking Answers To Spying Claims

New reports allege that the NSA spied on Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto, seen here walking with President Barack Obama in June, when he was a candidate for office. Mexico and Brazil have demanded a response to charges of U.S. spying on their internal affairs.
Ben Stansall AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 3:14 pm

Allegations that U.S. agents spied on Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto when he was a candidate during last year's campaign have led Mexico to summon U.S. Ambassador Anthony Wayne and demanded "a thorough investigation."

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Americas
4:00 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Pena Nieto Encourages Mexicans To Embrace Change

Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto presents his first annual report to the nation during a ceremony before the Congress at his presidential residence in Mexico City on Monday.
Omar Torres AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 7:23 pm

Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto says his nation is undergoing a major change — one his country should not fear. Pena Nieto gave an upbeat assessment of his nine-month-old administration in his first State of the Union address on Monday.

Despite his positive review of Mexico's condition, the new president is dealing with chaotic protests in the capital, intractable levels of violence and a less favorable economic outlook than predicted.

He campaigned on the promise of creating a modern and prosperous Mexico. And according to his appraisal, he's done just that.

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Technology
3:43 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Beyond The Shadows: Apple's iOS 7 Is All About The Screen

Craig Federighi, senior vice president of software engineering at Apple, discusses features of the new iOS 7 during the keynote address of the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference on June 10 in San Francisco.
Eric Risberg AP

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 3:55 pm

At some point in the coming weeks, users of Apple iPhones and iPads will wake up to an alert that there is a new version of the company's mobile operating system, known as iOS, for them to install.

If users follow historical patterns, within a few days of the launch of iOS 7, almost all of them will install the updated software and, just like that, more than 500 million phones and tablets will be made new. Never before has a technology industry launch come close to matching the scale and speed of this switch.

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Food Insecurity
3:28 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

How Many People Are Going Hungry In South Florida? Maybe More Than You Think

Volunteers hand help hand out food at an event in South Beach for Hunger Action Month.
Credit Arianna Prothero/WLRN

South Florida is known as a place where the wealthy live and play, but activists say that image can hide some of the problems facing residents in poorer areas-- specifically the issue of hunger.

The organization Feeding South Florida raises awareness and food donations for people who don’t know where their next meal is coming from. The group serves the whole region from Palm Beach to Monroe County and it’s ramping up its efforts this month to get more people engaged in solving the problem.

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Environment
3:23 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Two Alligators Topping 720 Pounds Each Caught In Mississippi

Beth Trammell of Madison, Miss., poses with the 723.5-pound alligator she and five others caught over the weekend.
Ricky Flynt Mississippi Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks Department

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 6:24 pm

Two alligators, each weighing more than 720 pounds, were caught in Mississippi this past weekend, setting a new state record for heaviest male alligator. Both animals measured more than 13 feet in length; it took hours to get the trophies into the hunters' boats.

The huge reptiles were brought down on the same day, setting a state record that stood for less than two hours before it was broken again.

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The Florida Roundup
7:00 am
Tue September 3, 2013

How Drugs May Be Helping Miami’s Real Estate Rebound

Credit Jeff Hester / Creative Commons/Flickr

For 18 months straight South Florida home prices have been rising. One reason is cash. For every 10 homes sold in July in our region, seven were bought with cash: no mortgage, no credit check.  

Moreover, 90 percent of the cash buyers of Miami condos are foreign, which often means less financial oversight is involved in the purchase.

RELATED: What Kind Of Money Fuels The Miami Real Estate Market?

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Politics
8:00 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Florida To Replace 'Mental Retardation' With 'Intellectual Disability' Throughout State Law

Derrick Sneed asked the Florida Legislature to end use of the R word - “retardation” - in state law.
Credit Gina Jordan/WLRN

Thirty-seven-year-old Derrick Sneed testified before Florida lawmakers last spring for a new law that removes all references to “mental retardation” in state law. 

“The more I learn about the R-word (the more I want) to get rid of this R-word and stop this R-word right now. It’s very important to me,” Sneed said. “People say retarded – and I said respect someone.”

The term “mental retardation” is being removed from more than 400 Florida statutes and being replaced with “intellectual disability.”

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