After sexual assault, this former aid worker found little help from UN

9 hours ago

Editor's note: This piece's author, Amy Costello, is reporting on aid workers' experiences with sexual harassment and abuse. She would like to hear from you. Call us at 857-285-4157 and leave a confidential message. 

Shannon Mouillesseaux was violently assaulted a decade ago in Sri Lanka while working for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

The attack itself was deeply traumatic. But Mouillesseaux says the way she was treated by UNHCR in the aftermath was even more damaging.

Tim Padgett /

Venezuelans are fleeing to places like South Florida because of their country’s humanitarian crisis, but also because of its human rights crisis. On Thursday the University of Miami was a focal point of the outcry over the socialist regime’s abuses.

More and more, the international community is waking up to the worsening human rights situation in Venezuela. This week, the U.N.’s High Commissioner for Human Rights called for an inquiry into reports of hundreds of killings of civilians by state security forces last year.

Six months after Maria, Puerto Rico is burdened with challenges

11 hours ago

As Puerto Rico approaches the six-month mark since Hurricane Maria devastated the island, many want to know why thousands of residents are still without power.

The storm is considered the worst natural disaster on record for the island of 3.4 million people. Officials list the death toll at 64 but the number of people killed could be over 1,000. The widespread destruction combined with an extremely complicated power system has left thousands in the dark.

Kristen M. Clark / Herald/Times Tallahassee bureau

Guests for Sundial on Wednesday March 7:

Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum is one of the Democratic candidates running to be Florida's next governor. He shared his position on issues like gun reform, expanding Medicaid and public education.

For the past three weeks, Maram, a young Syrian mother, has been living in an underground shelter with her 3-year-old son, Ahmad, and his 8-month-old brother, Omar.

Like other underground shelters around their neighborhood in Eastern Ghouta, a suburb of the Syrian capital Damascus, this one is filled to capacity. They eat and sleep and wait out the days alongside 150 people as bombs fall overhead, reducing everything to rubble. They hardly see daylight and can’t get enough food. When they get a chance to peek outside, they can hardly recognize their own homes and streets.

Allen Eyestone, Palm Beach Post

The South Florida Water Management District announced Thursday that its board has approved handing off a design for a water storage reservoir south of Lake Okeechobee to its federal partner.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will now begin reviewing the tentatively selected reservoir plan which, in conjunction with a state restoration strategies plan, provides 350,000 acre-feet of above-ground storage.

As congressional Republicans and the Trump administration keep chipping away at the Affordable Care Act, a number of states are enacting laws that aim to safeguard its central provisions.

The GOP tax plan approved by Congress in the last days of 2017 repealed the ACA penalty for people who fail to carry health insurance, a provision called the individual mandate.

But before that federal change happens next year, some states are working to preserve the effects of the mandate by creating their own versions of it.

Screenshot / BSO

The Broward Sheriff’s Office is trying to set the record straight on developments after the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

BSO launched its own fact-checking website this week, giving a rundown of major announcements from the agency since the Feb. 14 shooting.

It's A Rocky Road To Power For Rural Women

18 hours ago

From Hollywood and Bollywood to the media, NGO and corporate worlds, stories about harassment and discrimination against women in the workplace have captured global attention for months. And rightly so.

But what about the millions of rural women facing these injustices, who almost never make the headlines?

Development agencies have struggled to find ways to help rural women overcome obstacles in male-dominated societies and to gain an education, to own land, to take out loans, to earn a living and to gain equal rights in all arenas.

When the bell rings at Chicago's Sullivan High School on the city's far north side, it's a familiar scene. Hundreds of students pour into the hallway heading to their next class. What's also becoming increasingly familiar is the presence of two uniformed police officers in the hallway keeping watch. The school resource officers often chat with the students passing by and Sullivan's principal Chad Adams says the officers provide a higher level of security for the school and much more.

Editor's note: This story was originally published in December and has been updated on March 8.

March 8 is International Women's Day — dedicated to celebrating the achievements of women in all arenas: social, economic, cultural, political and personal as well.

To mark the day, we've compiled some of the profiles we've done of truly remarkable women, from a 101-year-old runner from India to a Yemeni refugee who didn't let war stop her from being a scientist.

She was hanged in effigy and mocked in cartoons; laughed at by Congress for demanding equal rights for women and fined for casting her "illegal" vote in 1872; shouted down at public meetings and ridiculed in the press by the upright and uptight columnists of the day. That Susan B. Anthony, champion of the women's movement in the U.S., had to suffer these ignominies is well known.

On a 67-50 vote, the Florida House passed the gun safety bill, already approved by the Florida Senate earlier in the week. Governor Rick Scott won’t say whether he will sign the bill, now heading to his desk. He says he’ll weigh input from those who lost loved ones in last month's mass shooting at a South Florida high school.

Hector Gabino / El Nuevo Herald

Guests on Sundial for Tuesday, March 6:

Gubernatorial candidates from across the state are preparing for the primary elections that are taking place in August. Miami Beach's former mayor, Philip Levine, has tossed his hat in the ring to run to be Florida's next governor.  He spoke about his plans leading up to the primary elections and what he hopes to accomplish should he become Florida's next governor.

Desmond Boylan / AP via Miami Herald


This Sunday, Cuba will hold what passes for parliamentary elections there. Voters will ratify National Assembly candidates pre-selected by the ruling Communist Party. On April 19 the Assembly will elect one of its own as President of the country.

It’s a neat little system that’s even less democratic than the U.S. Electoral College.