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We’ve gotten used to hearing about chronic shortages in Venezuela – everything from food to medicine to condoms. Those hit Venezuelans where they live. Now there's a looming shortage that hits Venezuelans where they relax: Cerveza. Beer.

This is bad news for customers at Arepas, a Venezuelan sports bar in Miami Beach. They love ice-cold Polar – which is Venezuela’s most popular beer and a brand that’s well known outside the country as well.

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A Key West man was arrested this week on a federal charge after planning to bury a backpack timer bomb on the beach and set it off remotely with a cell phone, according to a charging document unsealed Tuesday. 

According to the affidavit, Harlem Suarez, 23, listed his "likes" on a Facebook account under his real name as "Jihadist," "Extraordinary Prayer for ISIS" and "Prayers for ISIS: Weapons of our Warfare." 

Ellyn Enderlin, University of Maine

Greenland is melting fast, and that's bad news for sea level rise and other impacts of climate change. 

“I don’t mean to make it sound so scary,” reporter Ari Daniel says by satellite phone from the cusp of Greenland’s Helhiem glacier. “This is one of the fastest-moving glaciers there is [here], it moves about three feet in an hour, you can almost see it [move].”

Brennan Linsley/Reuters

Among the lawyers who've worked for detainees at the US military base on Guantanamo Bay are attorneys who've long been jittery about their surroundings. 

Signs at the war court compound warn that the water isn't potable. The tents and containers where many live sit atop a former dumping ground for jet fuel. 

Now some of the military and civilian personnel claim this environment might be causing those who work at the base to develop cancer. 

Florida Panhandle Courthouse Chooses Confederate Flag 'Compromise'

4 hours ago
Tom Urban / News Service of Florida

After flying on the grounds of the courthouse for more than 50 years, the Confederate battle flag will be coming down in one Florida Panhandle county soon.

After nearly three hours of emotional testimony and almost 50 public speakers, the Walton County Commission unanimously voted Tuesday afternoon to remove the rebel flag from a Confederate monument at the courthouse in DeFuniak Springs.

REUTERS/Thomas Peter

For William Saito it's been a years-long battle to change the business culture in Japan. It's getting a bit easier, now that he's got the ear of Japan's prime minister. 

What he's telling Shinzo Abe is that the government has to stop propping up large, sometimes failing corporations. 

"There's actually too much subsidy and too much money by the government. And when the government uses their old tools of propping up these companies with money, you don't have this hunger to really try hard or to really innovate and take risks," he says.

There's new life in Japan's tech startup scene

7 hours ago
Naomi Gingold

It’s pretty common knowledge that the Japanese economy has been sputtering since its heyday in the 1980s. Whole sectors have been slow to innovate and face problem. For years the tech startup scene seemed really bleak.

But more recently there’s been a shift, at least when it comes to startups. And one community in particular has been generating quite a bit of noise, just a bit under the radar.

Eric Risberg / AP

Uber launched a new initiative called Uber Urban Partnership on Monday in a push to expand the ride-sharing service's presence in South Florida -- and on a grand scale.

 

The initiative, also known as UberUP, aims to hire 10,000 new drivers in the area, providing customers with faster and more reliable service. Likewise, Uber says it hopes that hiring new drivers will create jobs for local communities.

 

Maria Murriel / WLRN News

Every Thursday night, Peggy Mustelier drives to the muggy, buggy edge of the Everglades to visit a man without a country.

A visit to a traditional British seaside town is usually a fairly safe and relaxing, if uneventful way, to spend the summer.

But, in recent weeks a threat to that tranquililty has emerged. Not the weather. Not even soggy fish and chips. Something altogether more menacing: rogue seagulls.

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