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Politics
12:08 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

Florida Roundup: SOTU And Cuba

Dated photo of Pres. Obama.
Credit Sonya Herbert / whitehouse.gov

  On the Florida Roundup, we talk about the week's top stories with the area's journalists.

SOTU AND CUBA

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News
11:35 am
Fri January 23, 2015

Walk the streets of Kolkata and ask yourself, can I take a bad picture?

Ed Kashi

Seeing The News: There are places in the world that always make me wonder if it's even possible to take a bad photograph there. India, and those amazingly vivid colors, is high on the list for me especially when you see the pictures VII photographer Ed Kashi is taking. And, this is just one of many on his Twitter feed Friday. 

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News
9:10 am
Fri January 23, 2015

These never-before-seen WWII photos are 'just the tip of the iceberg'

One of the images Levi Bettweiser developed from among 31 rolls of World War II film for his Rescued Film Project.

Courtesy of the Rescued Film Project

For about two years, photographer Levi Bettweiser has been hunting for old, forgotten film to develop.

"You're always flying blind when it comes to rescued film," he says. "You have no idea what you're going to get." It usually ends up being run-of-the-mill family shots: birthdays, Christmases, vacation snaps. But then a contact phoned him up last year and told him about a batch of 31 undeveloped rolls of film he found at an Ohio auction.

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Feature
12:01 am
Fri January 23, 2015

North Miami Beach Community: Police Apology Not Enough

This bullet-riddled target sheet with mugshots of black men was found at Medley gun range.
Credit NBC 6

About a week after news broke that North Miami Beach police officers were using mugshots of black men for target practice, the city’s police chief J. Scott Dennis met quietly with a group of black residents to apologize in an emergency meeting.

“Listen you got to hear it from the heart. We’re sorry,” he said to about 40 people in the Washington Park Community Center. “My police department is sorry and I represent that department. We made a mistake.”

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News
6:39 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

Much of this Guantanamo detainee's diary didn't make it past government censors

Mohamedou Ould Slahi has been imprisoned at Guantánamo since 2002 without charges.

International Committee of the Red Cross

It took six years to win the declassification of the first-ever memoir published by a detainee at the Guantanamo Bay detention center — part of it, at least.

That memoir, Mohamedou Ould Slahi's "Guantánamo Diary," includes no less than 2,500 redactions, the black bars government censors use to make certain passages unreadable. 

Larry Siems, the book's editor, says some of the redactions border on the absurd. At one point, Slahi describes being moved out of his cell for the first time. 

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News
6:37 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

At New York's cat café, you can drink coffee and commune with cats — as long as you have a reservation

At Meow Parlour in New York, you can hang out with cats while you drink your coffee. But you have to make a reservation.

Alina Simone

New York isn’t known as a city that lags behind on global trends. Yet it took 16 years after the first cat café opened in Taipei for the public marriage of coffee and cat to be formalized here.

And while it’s sad we New Yorkers couldn’t get our cat on earlier, it did give the owners of Meow Parlour time to gather inspiration.

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News
5:16 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

You're Cuban. You've reached the US by boat. Now what?

A Cuban exile in Miami's "Little Havana" neighborhood reacts after the US announced that it would restore diplomatic ties with Cuba. Washington severed relations with the island more than 50 years ago, after Fidel Castro took power.

Carlos Barria/Reuters

Forget for a second that you live in the United States, that you know its laws, know English, know what a Social Security number is, let alone worrying about having one.

Now imagine that's the wave of information you are trying to absorb, quickly, in a small conference room in Miami. That's exactly what happens to some families when they arrive in the United States. 

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News
4:25 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

A Muslim and a Jew walk into a comedy club in Paris — and hilarity ensues

Outside Paris' Le Comedy Club before the performace of comedians Younes and Bambi, aka Younes Depardieuis and Samuel Djian. Younes is Muslim. Samuel is Jewish. 

Daniel Estrin

Have you heard the one about a Jew and an Arab who walk into a comedy club?

Just a week after the deadly attacks on the caricaturists at Charlie Hebdo and on Jews at a kosher supermarket, a French Muslim comic and a French Jewish comic took to the stage at Le Comedy Club in Paris — and made fun of each other.

The duo is called Younes and Bambi. Younes Depardieuis, 27, is the Arab. Samuel Djian, 22, aka Bambi, is the Jew.

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News
3:35 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

Relations with Russia chill, and nuclear security cooperation gets put on ice

President Barack Obama and Russia's foreign minister, Sergey Lavrov, are seen in this combination photo as they attend the opening ceremony of the Nuclear Security Summit in The Hague on March 24, 2014.

Yves Herman/Reuters

It may seem ironic, but nuclear weapons provided one of the few consistent bright spots in US-Russia relations over the past two decades. But now the two countries' cooperation on nuclear security may be coming to an end.

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News
3:25 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

Catholic leaders battle against free birth control in the Philippines

A tropical storm rages outside while Ruzel Delovino gathers her family into their dimly lit one-room home. A light bulb flickers as she cooks a small pot of rice, shared among her four youngest children, her husband and herself.

Water drips into the ramshackle apartments, stacked one on top of another in Manila’s most populated slum, Tondo. Below, rising floodwater — a mix of sewage, mud, and debris — flows through the narrow, crowded alleyways. The rain shows no sign of letting up.

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News
1:37 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

Civilians are caught in the renewed crossfire in Donetsk

A woman reacts as she stands at a market that, according to locals, was recently damaged by shelling in Donetsk. 

Alexander Ermochenko/Reuters

The crisis in Ukraine has been on a slow boil in recent weeks, but fighting between Russian-backed rebels and Ukrainian troops is heating up,

"The Russian backed-separatists are on the offensive in a number of places," says David Stern of the BBC. "We've had fighting around the Donetsk airport, attacks and shelling on other places. The Ukrainians are accusing the Russians of sending regular military men and arms across the border. If it is true, this is a significant escalation."

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News
1:35 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

Greenpeace names activists behind a failed stunt at Peru climate talks

Greenpeace message next to Peru's Nazca Lines.

Greenpeace video

It was a publicity stunt gone wrong. Now environmental organization Greenpeace is naming the activists responsible.

The group has provided Peruvian authorities with the names of the four activists principally responsible for vandalizing the Nazca Lines heritage site. The incident happened during last month’s international climate negotiations in Lima.

Activists positioned giant yellow letters on the ground that read “Time for change! The future is renewable. Greenpeace” near a hummingbird carved in the soil 1,500 years ago.

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News
12:16 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

What I learned growing up with a devout Hindu mom — and an atheist dad who made fun of her

My mother performs many religious rituals. This one is called Griha Parvesh, a Hindu house warming ceremony. My father makes fun of them all.

Courtesy of Deepak Singh

My mother is a devout Hindu. She follows every ritual, fasts for every festival on the Hindu calendar and performs most religious ceremonies. She even claims to have read every Hindu text.

She has a small temple in her home where she worships daily. When she is not praying in front of her temple, she is constantly chanting a religious verse.

But my father is an atheist who enjoys making fun of my mother’s piety.

"What god are you worshipping today?" he asks my mother every morning.

“What does it matter you?” she responds.

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News
10:16 am
Thu January 22, 2015

I never knew how differently France and America value religion

French soldiers patrol the street in a Jewish neighbourhood near a religious school and a synagogue as part of the highest level of "Vigipirate" security plan after the Islamist attacks in Paris.

Gonzalo Fuentes/Reuters

I made my first trip to France in December 2003, when I visited my French cousins in Paris. At the time, newspapers were headlined with the motto of the French Republic, but with the last word changed: “Liberté, Egalité, Laicité.”

That was the buzzword at the time: laicité, or secularism. A law was being advanced to forbid students at public schools from displaying any religious symbols — no headscarves for Muslim girls, no yarmulkes for Jewish boys. The law passed, and it's still in effect. 

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News
9:28 am
Thu January 22, 2015

I'm a woman in America, and I wasn't allowed to drive

Frimet Goldberger grew up in a Hasidic community in New York where women are forbidden to drive. She got her license at age 23, after she left the community.

Courtesy of Frimet Goldberger

I was 23 years old when I first started to drive. It’s not that I was afraid; I wasn’t allowed. Because I'm a woman.

I grew up in a small, densely populated village in upstate New York called Kiryas Joel. And in Kiryas Joel, woman don’t drive. It’s a village of ultra-Orthodox Hasidic Jews. In my hometown, women can't be jailed for driving like they can in Saudi Arabia. But driving is still forbidden. A woman who drives would risk being shunned, and her children expelled from the private Hasidic school. She could be excommunicated from the community.

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