Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

A year ago, Miami-Dade County Public Schools made a splash by eliminating out-of-school suspensions. At the time, Superintendent Alberto Carvalho cited research saying sending kids home made them fall behind in school and made them more likely to get into trouble again.

Latinos are by far the fastest growing chunk ofthe U.S. school population. A new report by the National Council of La Raza gives a fascinating snapshot of this fast-growing population.

Here are some highlights:


  • Over the last 15 years, Latino enrollment has significantly outpaced that of whites and African-Americans.
  • Latinos under the age of 18 now total 18.2 million, a 47 percent jump since 2000.
Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

Sebastien Kamgang has been looking for water since Tuesday. Not long enough, though, to be willing to pay $1.49 a bottle at a Price Choice supermarket near downtown Miami. “That’s ridiculous!” he said, adding that another store he’d been to already was selling small bottles for twice that much. “It’s just crazy how the shelves are going so fast.” He left empty-handed.

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

High school seniors started applying for financial aid three months early this year, thanks to changes introduced by the Department of Education to give families more time weigh their options.

At G. Holmes Braddock High School in Kendall, college advisor Maria Mendoza is walking a group of 12th graders through the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA. “If you don’t have a FAFSA ID, you’re going to request two: one for you and one for your parents,” she says, making the rounds as students input information on laptops. 

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

For a week this past summer, the football field at Booker T. Washington High School was home to a marching band larger than any the school itself had seen in years.

Cathleen Carter / WUSF

Looking back, Ronnie Wyche said it’s easy to spot the red flags: Recruiters dodged his questions, rushed him through enrollment paperwork and brushed aside concerns about being about to keep up in an engineering program after more than 30 years without taking a math class.


They read a book quietly under their desks, pester the teacher for extra credit, or, perhaps, they simply check out and act up.

Every classroom has a few overachievers who perform above their grade level and don't feel challenged by the status quo. A new report suggests they are surprisingly common — in some cases, nearly half of all students in a given grade.

In northwest Pennsylvania, along the edge of Lake Erie, you'll find the city of Erie.

There, the superintendent of the more than 12,000-student district has forwarded a plan that's causing a stir — calling for leaders to consider shutting down all of the district's high schools and sending students to the wealthier, whiter, suburban districts.


Superintendent Jay Badams says it's a "matter of fairness."

A sign on the front door said only that the school would be closed for a day after Labor Day weekend. Through closed blinds, visitors could glimpse desks still laden with paperwork in offices where the lights had been left on.

All morning, a steady stream of students pulled up out front of the Hialeah campus to see if the news was true: ITT Tech, one of the largest chains of for-profit colleges in the country, with more than 40,000 students spread across 130 campuses nationwide, was closed for good.

  Anya Contreras’ ninth grade algebra class started first thing in the morning, right around 7:30. “I’m not a math person, and I’m not a morning person either,” Contreras says, so she had a little routine to get through class. When she heard the teacher’s voice getting muffled, “I knew he was facing toward the board,” Contreras says. So she would close her eyes, let her head rest against the wall…and get a few seconds of precious sleep.

A Tallahassee judge is going to hold another hearing on the lawsuit challenging the state law that prevents some school children from being promoted to the fourth grade.

Verónica Zaragovia

A charter school in Immokalee, roughly 35 miles east of Fort Myers, wants to help migrant farm worker families overcome language barriers by using 21st century technology.


The Immokalee Community School, run by the Redlands Christian Migrant Association, is bringing children and their migrant parents into the classroom.

An appeals court says Florida's teacher union has no legal right to challenge the state's largest private school voucher program.

Love Krittaya

At the start of the school day, Rory Feinberg says "all anyone talks about is how tired they are."

Dwight Burdette / Creative Commons

For-profit colleges have gotten some unwanted government attention lately—for aggressive recruiting and high interest rates on loans, and for misleading students about what their degrees will help them accomplish.

The for-profit giant Corinthian Colleges shut down a year ago. Now another large operator, ITT Technical Institute, looks like it might be next: It is losing students quickly, its stock price has plunged to $2 a share, and the Obama administration is pushing to shut down the accreditors that oversee this school and many other for-profit colleges.