Education

FIU Students March for 'Clean' Dream Act

23 minutes ago
Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

Several dozen Florida International University students walked out of classes and marched around campus Thursday calling for federal immigration reform.

Students called on Congress to pass a “clean” Dream Act, without attaching it to anti-immigration policies like a border wall. They also protested the Trump administration’s decision to end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).  That’s President Obama’s policy to suspend deportation for young people who came to the U.S. illegally as children.

The Florida Constitution Revision Commission will consider a proposal that would make it easier for schools to comply with class-size limits, with any financial savings required to go toward higher teacher pay.

The chair of Miami-Dade County’s school board wants to set a deadline for the district to decide whether to join a  legal challenge against a controversial new charter school law.

Dropping The F-Bomb In Class? Teachers Weigh In

Nov 3, 2017

Warning: This post contains language that some may find offensive.

So we asked, and you answered: Is it ever OK for students to curse in the classroom?

The question comes out of our "Raising Kings" series, where a radical new approach in a Washington, D.C., high school has led educators to move beyond suspending students for disruptive behavior, to talking with those kids to learn where the behavior comes from.

FAU Study Finds 6% Of Adolescents Bully Themselves Online

Oct 31, 2017
Flickr/Eddie~S

Parents: Have your kids been cyberbullied? If so, have you considered they might be the ones posting mean comments about themselves?

A new Florida Atlantic University study published in the Journal of Adolescent Health found about about 6 percent of adolescents have engaged in “digital self-harm.”

Boys were more likely than girls to post or share mean things about themselves on social media. And LGBT kids were three times as likely than their peers to “self-troll.”

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

After Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico, 18-year-old Ledishla Acevedo booked a flight to Miami in hopes of continuing her college education in Florida.

When she arrived at her cousin’s house here, she turned on the lights and started to cry.

Then she took a hot shower and cried some more.

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

Howard Webster’s third graders had “first-day jitters” on Sept. 18. But the first day of school had been nearly a month earlier.

Gateway Environmental K-8 Learning Center in Homestead was closed for seven school days because of Hurricane Irma, as were most other schools in Miami-Dade and Broward counties.

“With the kids being out so long, it's like starting school all over again,” Webster said during an after-school event shortly after the storm.

"I'll be famous one day, but for now I'm stuck in middle school with a bunch of morons." That's harsh language from the downtrodden sixth-grade narrator of Diary of A Wimpy Kid, a blockbuster series of graphic novels.

But it speaks to a broader truth.

via www.drstevegallon.com

Eight South Florida Schools To Get Extra $2K Per Student

Oct 18, 2017
Miami Herald

Eight of South Florida’s most struggling schools will get a multi-million dollar boost over the next two years to offer social services like mental health care.

The state Board of Education on Wednesday awarded an extra $2,000 per student to 11 schools statewide, including five in Miami-Dade County and three in Palm Beach County. The awards are for the 2017-18 and 2018-19 school years.

Lindsey Kilbride

Broward County and a dozen other school districts filed a much-anticipated lawsuit targeting House Bill 7069 on Monday.

Peter Haden / WLRN

Gov. Rick Scott wants to spend more money on enhancing security at Jewish schools next year following a spate of bomb threats and anti-Semitic hate crimes.

But his plan has attracted criticism from civil rights groups and representatives of other religions who argue it’s too narrow and exclusionary.

The University of Florida's president is urging students to stay away from a speaking event on campus featuring white nationalist Richard Spencer.

Senate Pushes To Expand Bright Futures Scholarship

Oct 10, 2017
Miami Herald

An additional 44,000 Bright Futures students would have their scholarships expanded under a bill approved Monday by the Senate Education Committee.

The legislation (SB 4), sponsored by Sen. Bill Galvano, R-Bradenton, would increase scholarship coverage for “medallion scholars” in state universities from the current $77 per credit hour to $159, or roughly 75 percent of the cost of tuition and fees.

Patrick Farrell / Miami Herald

Miami-Dade County Public Schools wants to push back state testing after the district lost seven days of instruction to Hurricane Irma.

In a letter to Education Commissioner Pam Stewart, Superintendent Alberto Carvalho asked if the district could get an extra week before state English language arts and math tests take place this spring. (Read the letter below.)

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