Education

You can normally find Shawn Sheehan teaching math and special education in Norman, Oklahoma, just south of Oklahoma City. But school's out for the summer and instead, he's knocking on doors.

One-by-one he's asking voters in the state's central Senate District 15 to cast their vote for him. He's running unopposed in today's primary as an Independent, and after the polls close he'll know his Republican opponent.

Florida’s public university system is developing a program to address a shortage in nurses. The American Academy of Nursing has projected a shortfall extending through 2030.

The nation's colleges and universities have been on pins and needles waiting for the U.S. Supreme Court to decide whether race can be a factor in their admissions policies.

And so today's 4-3 ruling upholding the affirmative-action program at the University of Texas at Austin brought a sigh of relief to much of the higher education world.

Lindsey Williams / Twitter

“A successful superintendent has to satisfy many constituencies, keeping high achievers in the system while devoting resources to those who need them most,” Anthony Hamlet told reporters at a Pittsburgh press conference on the day he was tapped as the district’s next superintendent.

Something's wrong in America's classrooms.

According to new data from the Education Department, black students — from kindergarten through high school — are 3.8 times more likely to be suspended than white students.

Now the really bad news.

This trend begins in preschool, where black children are already 3.6 times more likely to be suspended than white students.

#PulseOrlandoSyllabus: A Resource To Understand And Heal

Jun 19, 2016
Twitter

After the shooting in Orlando last week, a group of queer and trans librarians and educators came together on Twitter around the hashtag #PulseOrlandoSyllabus.

 

Ending Out-Of-School Suspensions Is Still A Pending Assignment For Miami-Dade

Jun 14, 2016
Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

Madeleine Meran lost her temper in school and wound up getting suspended from North Miami Beach Senior High School.

Her punishment: 10 days at a Success Center – a site set up by the Miami-Dade County school system to give kids a place to go when they misbehave instead of simply kicking them out of school.

Meran, a senior at the time, went for one day. When her school work didn’t show up there, she didn’t see the point of going back.

“It was just ridiculous,” she said. “For the nine days remaining, I just stayed home.”

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

Nadiam Nesbitt sat two young men across from one another, called them Interviewer and Interviewee, and posed a question: “You’re the manager at Starbucks. What kind of questions would you ask him?”

 

The Interviewer blushed, averted his eyes, pleaded, “I don’t know anything about Starbucks.”

“What skills would you look for?” Nesbitt prodded.

 

“If he knew how to make coffee?” the Interviewer asked tentatively.

 

Gage Skidmore

Nearly four months after suspending his failed presidential campaign, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush is making his way back into politics on familiar ground. At the end of May, Bush re-took the helm of his advocacy organization, Foundation for Excellence in Education.

Dtobias / Wikimedia

Parents at an exclusive boarding school in Boca Raton are upset over the way administrators are communicating about the abrupt departure of a headmaster and the hiring of two law firms to investigate possible sexual abuse at the school.

Reporter Andrew Marra has been writing about this issue for the Palm Beach Post. He says it's unclear whether the two events are related. Our interview, below, starts off with a description of St. Andrew's School.

Rowan Moore Gerety

As a high school freshman, Aaron Willis was paralyzed from the waist down in a drive-by shooting while riding his bike in Wynwood. Wednesday, Willis graduated from Booker T Washington High School on the honor roll.

 

Willis wore a look of sheer determination as he walked across the stage to claim his diploma, walking with the aid of crutches and robotic leg supports. The friends and classmates who filled the auditorium lost it, their screams gradually coalescing into chants of “Aaron, Aaron.”

 

When students get suspended from school for a few days, they may not be the only ones who miss out.

A report released today by UCLA's Civil Rights Project tries for the first time to quantify the full social cost of so-called "exclusionary discipline."

Surge In Cuban Migration Shows Up At MDC

May 31, 2016

The wait began long before daybreak: By sunrise, more than 100 people had shown up. At 8 a.m., the line stretched down past the end of the building and snaked across the parking lot. Tickets to Hamilton? The new Star Wars movie?

No. The prize today was a coveted spot in English classes through Miami Dade College’s REVEST program, or Refugee/Entrant Vocational Education Services Program. George Delacruz brought his wife to sign up at 4:30 a.m. “Everybody knows, you know, ‘Hey, you have to be early. If not, you’re out!’”

For many students in Florida, summer vacation means finally getting out of the classroom and away from tests and homework.  But for some, the Summer also means figuring out where the next meal will come from. Now there are efforts underway to address hunger in North Florida—especially at times when a major food program—the school—is no longer in session. 

Miami-Dade to Adopt Performance Pay for Teachers

May 26, 2016
Miami-Dade County Public Schools

United Teachers of Dade and Miami-Dade County Public Schools reached a tentative salary agreement Wednesday that introduces merit pay for teachers new to the district and gives tenured teachers a 3 percent raise.

The new agreement, for the 2016-2017 school year, brings into play a longstanding controversy over a state law requiring school districts to adopt performance pay. The law calls for bonuses of up to several thousand dollars a year for teachers rated “effective” or “highly effective,” and says those bonuses must be larger than raises for seniority.

Pages