Education

When the latest “School Grades” were released last week, districts across the state scrambled to portray their results in the most favorable light possible: they focused on rules changes that led to a statewide drop in the proportion of A schools (Miami-Dade), or pointed out the number of schools that had held their A grades steady (Broward); they considered “A and B schools” together as a group.

 

 

laptop
Alan Joyce via Flikr / WLRN

Pass a class, get a free laptop.

 

High schoolers in Monroe County who might fear computer coding now have an incentive to add it to their class schedules.

 

The program Monroe Computes has promised a free laptop to all high school students in the county who successfully take and pass the advanced placement computer science class from Florida Virtual School.

 

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

After a year in Bertha Vasquez’s class at George Washington Carver Middle School, 13-year-old Penny Richards says she reads climate news while she rides the bus to school.

I step up to the counter at Willy's Cafe at Willamette High School in Eugene, Ore., and order a latte.

There's a powerful scent of fresh coffee in the air, and a group of juniors and seniors hover over a large espresso machine.

Carrie Gilbert, 17, shows how it's done: "You're going to want to steam the milk first," she explains. "Then once you have the coffee, dump it in and use the rest of the milk to fill the cup."

She hands over my order. Not bad.

Craig Pittman

A good story comes with a good setting,  and Craig Pittman, a Tampa Bay Times reporter, sets the scene for some of Florida's wildest stories in his latest book, Oh Florida!: How America's Weirdest State Influences the Rest of the Country.

Pittman says Florida has gained a reputation for producing some of the nation's most bizarre stories, like alligators battling pythons or unique government positions titled "mermaid." But Pittman hopes to link these stories to the rest of the world. 

When Lily Shum was little, she dreaded speaking up in class. It wasn't because she didn't have anything interesting to say, or because she wasn't paying attention or didn't know the answer. She was just quiet.

"Every single report card that I ever had says, 'Lily needs to talk more. She is too quiet,' " recalls Shum, now an assistant director at Trevor Day School in Manhattan.

She doesn't want her students to feel the pressure to speak up that she felt.

"Why are traffic lights red, yellow and green?"

When a child asks you a question like this, you have a few options. You can shut her down with a "Just because." You can explain: "Red is for stop and green is for go." Or, you can turn the question back to her and help her figure out the answer with plenty of encouragement.

The Florida Education Association’s continued lawsuit against the state’s de-facto school voucher program continues to rile program supporters. But the teacher’s union isn’t backing down until it’s forced to.

You can normally find Shawn Sheehan teaching math and special education in Norman, Oklahoma, just south of Oklahoma City. But school's out for the summer and instead, he's knocking on doors.

One-by-one he's asking voters in the state's central Senate District 15 to cast their vote for him. He's running unopposed in today's primary as an Independent, and after the polls close he'll know his Republican opponent.

Florida’s public university system is developing a program to address a shortage in nurses. The American Academy of Nursing has projected a shortfall extending through 2030.

The nation's colleges and universities have been on pins and needles waiting for the U.S. Supreme Court to decide whether race can be a factor in their admissions policies.

And so today's 4-3 ruling upholding the affirmative-action program at the University of Texas at Austin brought a sigh of relief to much of the higher education world.

Lindsey Williams / Twitter

“A successful superintendent has to satisfy many constituencies, keeping high achievers in the system while devoting resources to those who need them most,” Anthony Hamlet told reporters at a Pittsburgh press conference on the day he was tapped as the district’s next superintendent.

Something's wrong in America's classrooms.

According to new data from the Education Department, black students — from kindergarten through high school — are 3.8 times more likely to be suspended than white students.

Now the really bad news.

This trend begins in preschool, where black children are already 3.6 times more likely to be suspended than white students.

#PulseOrlandoSyllabus: A Resource To Understand And Heal

Jun 19, 2016
Twitter

After the shooting in Orlando last week, a group of queer and trans librarians and educators came together on Twitter around the hashtag #PulseOrlandoSyllabus.

 

Ending Out-Of-School Suspensions Is Still A Pending Assignment For Miami-Dade

Jun 14, 2016
Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

Madeleine Meran lost her temper in school and wound up getting suspended from North Miami Beach Senior High School.

Her punishment: 10 days at a Success Center – a site set up by the Miami-Dade County school system to give kids a place to go when they misbehave instead of simply kicking them out of school.

Meran, a senior at the time, went for one day. When her school work didn’t show up there, she didn’t see the point of going back.

“It was just ridiculous,” she said. “For the nine days remaining, I just stayed home.”

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