Education

Miami Herald Archive

Representatives for two charter schools that illegally loaned public money to schools outside Miami-Dade County gave their word to the MDCPS School Board Tuesday that they plan to get it back.

Still image from broadcast / MSNBC

For the past year, Miami-Dade County Public Schools has touted the success of an alternative-to-suspension program designed to provide counseling and academic support to students who act out, instead of suspending them from school altogether. When the school district announced a move to eliminate traditional outdoor suspensions before the 2015-2016 school year, it also introduced “Student Success Centers,” (SSC) a network of 10 sites (the number has since grown to 11) staffed by teachers and...

Two Miami-Dade Charter Schools Loaned $900K In Taxpayer Funds To Sister Schools

Dec 5, 2016
Creative Commons

Two Miami-Dade charter schools illegally transferred taxpayer funds by lending a combined $912,094 to sister schools outside the county, the top lawyer for the Florida Department of Education has determined.

Bill Would Deny Tuition For Undocumented Immigrant Students

Dec 1, 2016

A newly elected state senator has filed legislation that would undo a 2014 law allowing in-state tuition for some undocumented immigrant students, potentially reopening an emotionally charged debate in the wake of Donald Trump's presidential win.

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New data from the Department of Education shows that students at hundreds of for-profit certificate and degree programs around the country end up earning the equivalent of less than the federal minimum wage after they graduate, even at programs that carry the possibility of tens of thousands of dollars in student debt.

Sarah Gonzalez / Stateimpact/NPR

Education Secretary John King addressed a letter to school administrators around the country Monday urging them to abandon corporal punishment of students.

Education Secretary John King is urging governors and school leaders in states that allow student paddling to end a practice he says would be considered "criminal assault or battery" against an adult.

When the Obama administration announced last year that it would overhaul the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, prospective college students (and their parents) cheered. "Today, we're lending a hand to millions of high school students who want to go to college and who've worked hard," said Arne Duncan, who was at that time U.S. secretary of education. "We're announcing an easier, earlier FAFSA." And it is both. Earlier because it's now available to students in October instead...

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

It's 12 noon on a school day in November: 12th grader Beltran Arellanes should be in his AP government class at MAST Academy, a magnet school and one of the highest-ranked high schools in Florida. Instead, he's walking into a Donald Trump rally at Bayfront Park Amphitheater in Miami, along with his ninth grade sister Casilda.

ITT Tech materials, courtesy of Waltter Teruel

Before he moved to Miami, Waltter Teruel sold antiques and life insurance in New York. Working as a recruiter at ITT Technical Institute in Hialeah was a welcome change. “I mean, if you’re a salesperson, you have to lie through your teeth,” he said, “but in this case, it’s one of the sales where you actually don’t have to lie at some point.”

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

Thirteen-year-old Ivana Fenelon walked up to me outside a church and primary school in Camp Perrin the week after Hurricane Matthew had leveled most of the homes in Pérénie, the rural hamlet where she lives with her family, a three-hour walk into the mountains. “I want to talk too,” she said, as I finished an interview about the hurricane with a farmer from another nearby town. “What he’s saying is important,” she explained. “There must be some things that are very painful for him that he’s...

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

A year ago, Miami-Dade County Public Schools made a splash by eliminating out-of-school suspensions. At the time, Superintendent Alberto Carvalho cited research saying sending kids home made them fall behind in school and made them more likely to get into trouble again.

Latinos are by far the fastest growing chunk ofthe U.S. school population. A new report by the National Council of La Raza gives a fascinating snapshot of this fast-growing population. Here are some highlights: Demographics Over the last 15 years, Latino enrollment has significantly outpaced that of whites and African-Americans. Latinos under the age of 18 now total 18.2 million, a 47 percent jump since 2000. Though white children are still the majority in this age group — 52 percent — Latino...

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

Sebastien Kamgang has been looking for water since Tuesday. Not long enough, though, to be willing to pay $1.49 a bottle at a Price Choice supermarket near downtown Miami. “That’s ridiculous!” he said, adding that another store he’d been to already was selling small bottles for twice that much. “It’s just crazy how the shelves are going so fast.” He left empty-handed. Nearby, Joshua Mena was trying to reassure his customers as he unloaded the last cases onto the shelves. “Wait two hours and...

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

High school seniors started applying for financial aid three months early this year, thanks to changes introduced by the Department of Education to give families more time weigh their options. At G. Holmes Braddock High School in Kendall, college advisor Maria Mendoza is walking a group of 12th graders through the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA. “If you don’t have a FAFSA ID, you’re going to request two: one for you and one for your parents,” she says, making the rounds as...

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